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Voter Guide: 2020 General Election, State and Local Races

Voter registration and early voting information below; A comprehensive list of all North Texas races will be added to this page in mid-October

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Below is the 2020 voters guide to the November general election. In it you will find key dates, how to register to vote or check your status, how to find out where and when you are able to vote and what you'll need to bring with you. There is also information on what to expect to find on your ballot as well as information on other topics such as poll watchers and straight-ticket voting.

Key Dates

Oct. 5 - Last Day to Register to Vote
Oct. 13 - First Day of Early Voting

Oct. 23 - Last Day to Apply for Absentee Ballot
Oct. 30 - Last Day of Early Voting
Nov. 3 - Election Day

How to Register/Am I Registered?

The last day to register to vote in the state of Texas was Monday, Oct. 5. You can check your voter status at VoteTexas.gov. If you have not yet registered you will not be able to vote in this election, but you can still register to vote in future elections by printing out an application online and then mailing it to your county election office. Also, Texans can now register to vote online, but only when they renew or update their driver's license.

Where Do I Vote?

Voters in 14 North Texas counties are approved to use the Countywide Polling Place Program for the Nov. 3 General Election, which means they can vote at any polling location they like. Those counties that are CPPP approved are: Collin, Dallas, Ellis, Erath, Grayson, Henderson, Hood, Hopkins, Jack, Kaufman, Navarro, Palo Pinto, Parker and Tarrant. See a full state list of approved CPPP counties here. Voters in all other counties must vote at their designated precinct on Election Day.

Early Voting Locations and Wait Times

While every county offers early voting between Oct. 13-30, they do not all have the same hours of availability. See the schedules and wait times (where available) for Collin, Dallas, Denton and Tarrant counties below -- all other North Texas counties are listed below that.

  • Collin County early voting schedule -- Collin County voters may vote at any early voting location -- see a list of locations here including wait times. The wait times at each location are marked in either green, yellow or red, indicating wait times of 20 minutes or less, 40 minutes or less and more than 40 minutes, respectively.
    Early Voting Schedule
    Oct. 13-16: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    Oct. 17: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    Oct. 18: 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    Oct. 19-24: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    Oct. 25: 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    Oct. 26-30: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    On Nov. 3, Election Day, polling locations will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    **More information, sample ballots, etc., available at Collin County Elections
  • Dallas County early voting schedule -- Dallas County voters may vote at any early voting location -- see a list of locations here including wait times. The wait times at each polling place in green, yellow and red, indicating wait times of 20 minutes or less, 40 minutes or less or, greater than 40 minutes, respectively.
    Early Voting Schedule
    Oct. 13-17: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    Oct. 18: 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    Oct. 19-24: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    Oct. 25: 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    Oct. 26-30: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    **More information, sample ballots, etc., available at Dallas County Elections
The American Airlines Center opened Tuesday as a “Mega Center” for early voting. Thousands are expected to vote at the location before Oct. 30.

What Identification Do I Need to Vote?

You must present one of the following forms of photo ID when voting in person:

  • Texas driver's license issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)
  • Texas Election Identification Certificate (EIC) issued by DPS
  • Texas personal identification card issued by DPS
  • Texas Handgun License issued by DPS
  • A United States Military Identification card containing the person’s photograph
  • A United States Citizenship Certificate containing the person’s photograph
  • A United States Passport (book or card)

Absentee Ballots

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) dramatically reduced the number of locations across the state that can accept a handed-in absentee ballot to ensure that poll watchers had adequate access to each location. So, beginning on Oct. 2, mail ballots delivered in-person by eligible voters can only be delivered to one location in each Texas county -- that location is designated by each county's early voting clerk.

To qualify for a mail-in ballot in Texas, voters must be: away from their county of residence on Election Day and during the early-voting period; sick or disabled; confined in jail but otherwise eligible to vote; or 65 years old or more.

The last day to apply for an Absentee Ballot is Oct. 23; Absentee ballots may be turned-in in person at any time as long as it's received by 7 p.m. on Election Day. Absentee ballots that are mailed in must be postmarked by Election Day.

  • In Tarrant County, absentee ballots can be dropped off in person at the Tarrant County Elections Administration office at 2700 Premier Street, during regular business hours. The ballot may also be hand-delivered on Election Day between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. You may only hand-deliver your own envelope and not for another individual and you must bring ID. Read more here.
  • In Dallas County, absentee ballots can be dropped off at the Early Voting Clerk's Office at 1520 Round Table Drive. A full schedule, with extended hours, is available on DallasCountyVotes.org. You may only hand-deliver your own envelope and not for another individual and you must bring ID.
  • In Denton County, absentee ballots can be dropped off at the Early Voting Clerk's Office at 701 Kimberly Drive. Ballots may be hand-delivered during regular business hours. You may only hand-deliver your own envelope and not for another individual and you must bring ID. Read more here.
  • In Collin County, absentee ballots can be dropped off at the Elections Department at 2010 Redbud Boulevard during regular business hours. More information can be found here. You may only hand-deliver your own envelope and not for another individual and you must bring ID.

What's On My Ballot? Sample Ballots

Key races from federal, district, state and counties will be listed below. It is not a comprehensive list of all races and not all races will appear on all ballots. The comprehensive list of all races will be added and linked from this page in mid-October. To see sample ballots for your specific county, you'll need to visit your county election webpage (links are below).

County Election Pages: Anderson, Bosque, Comanche, Collin, Cooke, Dallas, Delta, Denton, Ellis, Erath, Fannin, Freestone, Hamilton, Henderson, Hill, Hood, Hopkins, Hunt, Jack, Johnson, Kaufman, Lamar, Navarro, Palo Pinto, Parker, Rains, Red River, Rockwall, Somervell, Tarrant, Van Zandt, Wise

Key Federal Races

This is a listing of two key federal races that some Texas voters will be asked to vote on. The only two races are for the offices of president and U.S. Senate.

President
Donald Trump (R) Incumbent
Joe Biden (D)
Howie Hawkins (G)
Jo Jorgensen (L)

U.S. Senate
John Cornyn (R) Incumbent
MJ Hegar (D)
David B. Collins (G)
Kerry McKennon (L)

Key District Races

This is a listing of some of the key district races that some Texas voters will be asked to vote on. It is not a complete list. That list will be added and linked from this page in mid-October. To see a list of all district, state and federal races on a particular county's ballot, click here and select the year, election and county of your choice.

U.S. Rep. District 3
Van Taylor (R) Incumbent
Lulu Seikaly (D)
Christopher J. Claytor (L)

U.S. Rep. District 4
Pat Fallon (R)
Russell Foster (D)
Lou Antonelli (L)

U.S. Rep. District 5
Lance Gooden (R) Incumbent
Carolyn Salter (D)
Kevin A. Hale (L)

U.S. Rep. District 6
Ron Wright (R) Incumbent
Stephen Daniel (D)
Melanie A. Black (L)

U.S. Rep. District 12
Kay Granger (R) Incumbent
Lisa Welch (D)
Trey Holcomb (L)

U.S. Rep. District 24
Beth Van Duyne (R)
Candace Valenzuela (D)
Darren Hamilton (L)
Steve Kusmich (I)
Mark Bauer (I)

U.S. Rep. District 25
Roger Williams (R) Incumbent
Julie Oliver (D)
Bill Kelsey (L)

U.S. Rep. District 26
Michael C. Burgess (R) Incumbent
Carol H. Iannuzzi (D)
Mark Boler (L)

U.S. Rep. District 30
Tre Pennie (R)
Eddie Bernice Johnson (D) Incumbent
Eric Williams (I)

U.S. Rep. District 32
Genevieve Collins (R)
Colin Allred (D) Incumbent
Christy Mowrey Peterson (L)
Jason Sigmon (I)

U.S. Rep. District 33
Fabian Cordova Vasquez (R)
Marc Veasey (D) Incumbent
Jason Reeves (L)
Rene Welton (I)
Carlos Quintanilla (I)

Key State Races

This is a listing of some of the key statewide races that all Texas voters will be asked to vote on. It is not a complete list. That list will be added and linked from this page in mid-October. To see a list of all district, state and federal races on a particular county's ballot, click here and select the year, election and county of your choice.

Texas Railroad Commission
James "Jim" Right (R)
Chrysta Castaneda (D)
Matt Sterett (L)
Katija "Kat" Gruene (G)

Texas Supreme Court, Chief Justice
Nathan Hecht (R) Incumbent
Amy Clark Meachum (D)
Mark Ash (L)

Texas Supreme Court, Place 6 - Unexpired Term
Jane Bland (R) Incumbent
Kathy Cheng (D)

Texas Supreme Court, Place 7
Jeff Boyd (R) Incumbent
Staci Williams (D)
William Bryan Strange III (L)

Texas Supreme Court, Place 8
Brett Busby (R) Incumbent
Gisela D. Triana (D)
Tom Oxford (L)

Key Local Races

Local races where the candidate is running unopposed, such as the Denton County Sheriff or Collin County Sheriff, are not listed below. This is not a complete listing of local races, that list will be added and linked from this page in mid-October.

Collin County Commissioner Precinct 1
Susan Fletcher (R) Incumbent
Courtney Brooks (D)

Collin County Commissioner Precinct 3
Darrell Hale (R) Incumbent
Dianne C. Mayo (D)

Dallas County Sheriff
Chad Prda (R)
Marian Brown (D) Incumbent

Dallas County Commissioner Precinct 1
Patrick Harden (R)
Theresa Daniel (D) Incumbent

Dallas County Commissioner Precinct 3
S.T. Russell (R)
John Wiley Price (D) Incumbent
Clyde Jewell (L)

Denton County Commissioner Precinct 1
Ryan Williams (R)
Sandy Swan (D)

Denton County Commissioner Precinct 3
Bobbie J. Mitchell (R) Incumbent
Delia Parker-Mims (D)

Tarrant County Sheriff
Bill Waybourn (R) Incumbent
Vance Keyes (D)

Tarrant County Commissioner Precinct 1
Roy E. Lozano (R)
Roy Charles Brooks (D) Incumbent

Tarrant County Commissioner Precinct 3
Gary Fickes (R) Incumbent
Kathy Braatz (D)

Straight-Ticket Voting

Most states don't offer straight-ticket voting. Texas has for decades, but Republican Gov. Greg Abbott signed a law removing the option in 2020. That measure was pushed through by a GOP-controlled Legislature that argued the change would encourage voters to cast better-informed ballots on Election Day.

Democrats challenged the change in court in March, citing long Super Tuesday lines in Houston where some voters waited more than an hour to vote. They said the law disproportionately hurts Black and Latino voters in big urban counties, where longer ballots mean wait times.

Last month a federal appeals court blocked a ruling that Texas must offer straight-ticket voting for November's election after the Texas Secretary of State's office argued that making a change now would create a "logistical nightmare."

So, no straight-ticket voting will be available in this election.

What is a Poll Watcher?

A poll watcher is a person appointed to observe the conduct of an election on behalf of a candidate, political party or the proponents or opponents of a particular measure. Their role in an election is established by Chapter 33 of the Texas Election Code and they must adhere to certain rules at polling locations.

The primary duty of a watcher is to observe the conduct of the election at the location where the watcher has been appointed. A watcher may point out to an election judge or clerk any observed irregularity or violation of the Texas Election Code. However, if the clerk refers the watcher to the judge, the watcher may not discuss the matter further with the clerk unless the presiding judge invites the discussion.

  • A poll watcher must have a certificate of appointment that includes their name, address, information on who appointed them and the precinct in which they are permitted to serve.
  • Poll watchers cannot be current candidates or elected officials.
  • Poll watchers are not allowed to engage or talk to voters in any manner about the election.
  • No more than two poll watchers may be at any particular polling place at any given time.
  • Poll watchers cannot talk with an election officer regarding the election except to call attention to an irregularity or violation.
  • The watcher cannot reveal information about voters or the votes before the polls close or face possible criminal charges.
  • A poll watcher can witness the installation of voting equipment and observe the securing of equipment before the election.
  • A poll watcher can observe any activity conducted at the location and sit or stand conveniently near the election officials to observe the election activities, but they are not allowed to go into voting booths with voters while they are marking their ballot.
  • Poll watchers are permitted to observe assistance given to voters by election officials and to inspect the ballot before it's deposited in the ballot box to determine if it was prepared in accordance with the voter's wishes.
  • Poll watchers are permitted to inspect the returns and other records prepared by election officials. They are also allowed to observe the tallying and counting of votes to verify that they are tallied and read correctly.
  • Poll watchers may also be on the lookout for illegal activities, including but not limited to, electioneering, loitering, voters attempting to vote without identification, others attempting to coerce or bribe voters.

The Texas Poll Watchers Guide can be found here.

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