Dallas Police Monitor Video for Bus Stop-Arm Violations - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Dallas Police Monitor Video for Bus Stop-Arm Violations

Authorities said the cameras allow them to always watch for this type of violation, which they hope will put an end to them

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Dallas PD Spot School Bus Stop Sign Violators

    Law enforcement agencies are cracking down on drivers who ignore bus stop signs. (Published Wednesday, April 29, 2015)

    After an SUV nearly hit three children trying to board a school bus in Washington, law enforcement agencies are cracking down on drivers who ignore bus stop signs.

    Dallas County Schools, the organization that provides buses to 11 districts, has cameras on their 1,700 buses. 

    Video from 2013 showed a child hit after walking off of a bus, when a driver didn't stop. The bus had its stop sign out. It was chilling to watch, but luckily, the student was able to walk away.

    "I don't know what they're thinking," Dallas County Schools Board President Larry Duncan said. "They are so impatient to get where they're going and nothing is that important to put our kids at risk."

    Dallas Police Monitor Video for Bus Stop-Arm Violations

    [DFW] Dallas Police Monitor Video for Bus Stop-Arm Violations
    Dallas police say they have used surveillance cameras mounted on buses to cite thousands of drivers for ignoring school bus stop arms.
    (Published Wednesday, April 29, 2015)

    Dallas police said they monitor for bus stop-arm violations via live feeds from cameras mounted on buses and determine if drivers should be cited.

    "If the bus stops, you need to stop," Duncan said.

    In three years, Dallas police said they have caught 92,000 violators.

    An NBC 5 investigation did uncover that of the people who challenged, about 68 percent of the citations were dismissed.

    "We have been working closely with the city manager, and with the staff at the city. We are now down to about 30 percent dismissal rate but remember its only 10 percent get appealed anyway," said Duncan.

    The NBC 5 investigation also found the program cost more than anticipated.

    Duncan says they are back on track now.

    NBC 5's Ellen Bryan and Julie Fine contributed to this report.

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