The swirling force of Texas politics

Wendy Davis Talks Before Possible Campaign Kick Off

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    NEWSLETTERS

    All eyes will be on Haltom City this week. That’s because it is there, state Senator Wendy Davis is expected to announce her run for governor’s office. Davis spoke to a political conference on Sunday. (Published Sunday, Sep 29, 2013)

    All eyes will be on Haltom City this week as state Senator Wendy Davis is expected to announce her run for governor’s office. 

    Davis spoke to a political conference on Sunday, four days before she was expected to formally announce her bid for Texas governor.

    It was a nearly 13-hour filibuster on abortion that catapulted Sen. Davis into the national spotlight, and political experts say it’s abortion that will come up again during the race.

    The measure eventually passed after Gov. Rick Perry called a second special legislative session.

    “I’m so struck by young women who come up to me, many of them who have tear in their eyes." said Davis during the Texas Tribune Fest on Sunday. "Some of them who don’t even say a word. They just hug me and the expression their face says so much."

    Dr. Allan Saxe, a professor of political science at the University of Texas Arlington said this will force the most notable Republican running for the seat to campaign harder.

    Republican Greg Abbott, the current Texas Attorney General, announced his candidacy for the Governor in July. Dr. Saxe believes Abbott will fight for the seat.

    “He's going to have to take this very, very seriously and not make any mistakes,” said Saxe.

    The race will be one viewed nationally, as the Democrats have their eyes on the changing demographics in Texas. Davis who came to fame in pink sneakers, could help turn Texas a different color. Dr. Saxe believes she could turn it purple.

    “It ain’t going to be blue tomorrow, but it could turn a different shade,” he said.

    Davis also said she opposes raising the sales or property tax rates, but said the Legislature needs to review $35 billion in tax exemptions.

    Davis is the only major candidate expected to seek the Democratic nomination for governor. A Democrat has not won statewide since 1994.