Dog Train Rolls Through Fort Worth Golf Course

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Golfers can usually see a Eugene Bostick driving a tractor with eight barrels in tow with the tops cut out, and inside each one, a dog, anxiously wagging its' tail. (Published Saturday, Apr 26, 2014)

    There is an unusual sight these days at a Fort Worth golf course. One that has golfers stopping mid-shot to stare, then ask to take a picture.

    Eugene Bostick can usually be seen driving a tractor with eight barrels in tow with the tops cut out. Inside each one is a dog anxiously wagging its’ tail.

    It's a Dog Day at Sycamore Creek Golf Course

    It's a Dog Day at Sycamore Creek Golf Course
    Glenn Lacy was at Sycamore Creek Golf Course and said this just appeared out of nowhere and it was too funny not to share. (Published Wednesday, Apr 23, 2014)

    He calls it: the dog train.

    “They were strayed and we started picking them up,” Eugene Bostick said.

    He and his brother, Corky, have lived on their 13-acre land in East Fort Worth since the early 1940s.

    “Well, in our generation people shot everything they saw. And when we moved, that’s what we did,” said Corky Bostick. “We finally realized you know, what was happening, so we went to just the reverse.”

    Now every morning the brothers wake up to feed the wildlife on the land, and make sure the dogs enjoy their day as well.

    “I started out with my tractor. I had a little trailer and I put four or five dogs in there and took them riding. Then more dogs started to show up and I said, ‘Uh-oh! That’s not enough room!’ That’s when I came up with that,” Eugene Bostick said pointing to his train.

    The dogs’ twice-weekly ride runs straight through the Sycamore Golf Course that's positioned along the back of the Bostick property.

    The dogs don’t seem to mind.

    “They bark a lot. Then they get tired and just stop and look around,” Eugene Bostick said.

    The golfers get a big kick out of it, and usually take their cameras put to take pictures, Eugene Bostick said.

    The entire ride lasts an hour and a half. Corky Bostick said he hopes it’s a tradition, that will last his lifetime.

    “Well I’ve been feeding the wildlife for over 30 years here, and I’m going to live another 30," Corkey Bostick said. "I’m only 86!” “My wife said if I didn’t get up and do this I’d be dead. And I really would."