Red Fever
Complete coverage of the Texas Rangers

Rangers Fans Warned About Fake World Series Tickets, Souvenirs

Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    Major League Baseball and local police will crack down on counterfeit merchandise and tickets for the World Series.

    Arlington police spokeswoman Tiara Richard said MLB is in town to help look for fakes.

    "They can go out with our officers and they can say, 'That is not a trademarked item; they should not be selling that,' and so those items are confiscated," she said.

    Sellers of counterfeit merchandise and tickets can be arrested.

    Look Out for Counterfeit World Series Merchandise

    [DFW] Look Out for Counterfeit World Series Merchandise
    Police and Major League Baseball will be on the look out for people selling counterfeit merchandise that doesn't have the MLB trademark hologram logo.

    Official merchandise is labeled with a sticker or holographic tag along with sewn-in or screen-printed labels identifying a licensee that has been authorized to sell or produce the items.

    Roadside stands around North Texas are selling World Series commemorative items, some of which are do not carry those markings.

    Temporary vendors that operate such stands in Dallas are required to obtain a city permit.

    A stand on Regal Row at Stemmons Freeway on Friday had a permit hanging in clear view but also had many T-shirts and other items on display that did not include the official stickers and logos.

    Clerk Nickle Lin said he came from Hawaii to work for a vendor who provided the merchandise.

    But Lin claimed the items without official markings do not violate copyright laws because they also do not include any team name or the words "World Series."

    Many included only the words "Champions Texas."

    "It's not copyrighted," Lin said.

    One customer who purchased one of the shirts for $15 but declined to give her name said official merchandise probably costs much more.

    "I don’t want to go to a store and get one," she said. "I'm good with this today."

    A stand on Walnut Hill Lane near Harry Hines Boulevard in Dallas that did not have a permit on display had a sign advertising T-shirts, $8 and up.

    Among the items were shirts that refer to pitcher Cliff Lee -- obviously merchandise from last year's World Series.

    Clerk Leroy Ortiz said he had come from California to work for a vendor and did not know about any restrictions.

    "It's our first time here, and we just sell it," he said.

    Police spokesman Senior Cpl. Kevin Janse said Dallas officers do not operate a special partnership with MLB officials but are visiting the roadside stands occasionally as time allows.

    Richard said Arlington police are actively looking for fake merchandise and fake tickets.

    "We're encouraging people to only buy from reputable vendors," she said. "That way you know the ticket you buy is secure, it's a true ticket, and it will get you into the game."