Carter In The Classroom

Focusing on unique things school districts are doing to help children succeed.
Carter in the classroom

Finding Solutions For Students Who Learn Differently

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We’ve all talked about how difficult it is trying to teach our kids from home, especially while we work at home.

Think about this.

It’s a lot harder for grandparents out there who are raising their grandchildren and for those families whose children have special needs.

School districts can’t just hand them a laptop and hope for the best, it's a lot more complicated.

In Cedar Hill, they’re going door to door paying visits to those families. Trying to help provide a routine from a safe distance away.

"Just giving them some helpful tips things they can do at home to help accomodate them and get them used to the new schedule without them being overwhelming," said Marquita McCullum, Principal of Lake Ridge Elementary.

"We're just now getting into a system," said Tina Butler.

She and her husband Anthony are working to teach their grandson Jayden at home.

"About 15 minutes before you got here we had a mini meltdown with Jayden." said Anthony. "Being autistic when his routine is interrupted it becomes a difficult scenario."

His teachers know the issue.

"We’ll bounce ideas off each other and say tell the parents. 'Try this, or try this,'" said Melissa Tyler, a teacher at Waterford Oaks Elementary.  

Tyler and other special education teachers tried something too.

An early morning caravan to their student's doors.

Jayden got to come outside... and show off that Cedar Hill Longhorn pride...

As they drove around town it was clear the visits mattered.

"He was about to cry when it’s time to leave and he didn’t understand.  Why can’t I see you?  Why can’t you be with us?" Tyler said of a visit to another student's home.

While they don’t get social distancing, they do understand so much more.

"For us, our grandson, technology is his thing. Laptops, tablets, TV, cellphones.  Give him a few minutes and he’ll figure it out," said Anthony Butler.

"He’s on the tablet. And as long as we don’t bother him and make sure he has chicken nuggets he’s good."

So they’re handing out assignments, looking students in the eye, and reminding them they’ll be back for another visit really soon.

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