Watch Fort Worth Police's Body Cameras in Action

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    NEWSLETTERS

    NBC 5 has obtained video of three arrests recorded by the Fort Worth Police Department's new officer body cameras. The videos show arrests from the officer's perspective. (Published Tuesday, Nov 19, 2013)

    The clip-on body cameras now worn by Fort Worth police officers show the officer's side of the story.

    The Fort Worth Police Department in August ordered 145 additional AXON Flex cameras to complement the 50 it was already using.

    NBC 5 has obtained video of some arrests through an open records request.

    One of the videos shows the July arrest of a man suspected of public intoxication. The video shows two officers holding the handcuffed man face-down on the trunk of a police car. The footage, which does not show what led to that, also appears show his head being slammed onto the car before the two officers take him to the ground.

    A second video, which was also taken in July, shows some of the chaos that officers face.

    The video shows the chase of a man suspected of domestic violence who ran away on foot when officers tried to arrest him near Interstate 30. At one point, one of the officers points his gun directly at the suspect as officers order him to show his hands.

    Fort Worth police did not immediately respond Tuesday to repeated efforts for comment about the merits of the cameras and the videos received through the open records request.

    When the department ordered the additional cameras in August, Chief Jeffrey Halstead said the cameras allow the public to see controversial incidents from the officer’s perspective.

    "Every chief of police has a particular use-of-force incident that strained the public's trust and damaged their professional reputation," he said then. "This technology has the ability to document exactly what occurred, what was said, and has proven to clearly demonstrate the incident for the community."

    The first 50 AXON Flex cameras cost Fort Worth $85,000. The 145 additional cameras, which are expected to arrive in a matter of weeks, cost $670,000.

    Money seized by the department was used to pay for the cameras.