Texas Health Presbyterian Nurses Speak Out for 1st Time: "This Could Happen to Any Hospital" | NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Continuing coverage of the Ebola virus in Dallas

Texas Health Presbyterian Nurses Speak Out for 1st Time: "This Could Happen to Any Hospital"

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    Nurses at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas spoke out for the first time Monday since their hospital became the first in the United States to diagnose a patient with Ebola. Since then, two nurses who treated him have fallen ill with the virus. (Published Monday, Oct. 20, 2014)

    Top nurses at the Dallas hospital where two nurses fell ill treating the nation's first Ebola patient spoke out for the first time Monday, affirming their pride in their hospital amid scrutiny and vowing to reaffirm the public's trust.

    "The reason we're here today is to make sure people know that Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital is still a great hospital, an excellent hospital," chief nursing officer Cole Edmonson said at a brief news conference in front of the hospital Monday afternoon, flanked by nurses he called part of a "proud family."

    "We're proud to tell people that we work here," he added."We will reaffirm your trust in Presbyterian."

    "We are experts in our field, and we don't want to be judged by this one incident," emergency department nurse Julie Boling said, overcome by emotion. "This could happen to any hospital."

    Dallas Nurses Speak Out on Ebola Cases

    [DFW] Dallas Nurses Speak Out on Ebola Cases
    Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas is working to restore its image in the wake of the Ebola cases it has treated. Nurses spoke to reporters Monday for the first time since Thomas Eric Duncan became the first person to die of Ebola in the United States. (Published Monday, Oct. 20, 2014)

    The nurses gave their well-wishes to their two coworkers who remain hospitalized in isolation for Ebola, after they contracted the disease treating Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed in the U.S. He died Oct. 8.

    Amber Vinson is being treated at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, the same hospital where Fort Worth's Dr. Kent Brantly and American aid worker Nancy Writebol were successfully treated, and her coworker Nina Pham is being treated at the National Institutes of Health in Maryland.

    On Monday, health officials' efforts to contain Ebola's spread cleared a key hurdle when four dozen people were being cleared from the watch list.