Fad Hairstyle on Mesquite ISD's Chopping Block

Mesquite loosens clothing dress code, but bans extreme "faux-hawks"

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    Mesquite schools may be loosening its dress code, but not for "faux-hawks."

    A North Texas school district known nationwide for its strict dress code is making some changes, but isn't giving a hall pass to a popular spiky hairdo.

    The Mesquite Independent School District has made headlines for sending students home for hair that’s too long and jeans that are too tight. But the district is loosening its rules when it comes to clothing -- students can wear any color shoes, socks or belt next school year.

    Mesquite ISD Snips Off Faux Hawks

    [DFW] Mesquite ISD Snips Off Faux Hawks
    Mesquite schools may be loosening their dress code, but not for "faux-hawks."

    But the extreme "faux-hawk" is off-limits. The hairstyle is like a mohawk, but without the shaved sides.

    A district spokesperson said the district doesn’t want kids spending more time on their hair than on their studies.

    “I think maybe the school needs to do the same: Don't focus on the hairdos and start worrying about their education,” said Elizabeth Taylor, the mother of 4-year-old "Tator Tot," who was at the center of his own hair-raising controversy.

    Taylor's son was threatened with suspension earlier this school year when his parents refused to cut his long locks.

    “If it’s something your child believes in, I say, 'Fight it,” Taylor said.

    She braids her son’s hair every morning so that it doesn’t extend over his collar and violate the district’s dress code. But it's only a temporary fix -- Taylor plans to move out of Mesquite permanently at the end of the school year.

    “You ran one family out, and I hope you don’t run a bunch more out,” Taylor said.

    The Mesquite school district is still hammering out what constitutes an extreme faux-hawk, as opposed to one that is acceptable.

    A district spokesperson said they are creating an instructional video for students, parents and teachers.

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