Continuing coverage of the crisis on the Texas border and the surge of unaccompanied minors

Border Crisis: Protests, Foster Parents And Reaching Out To Residents

View Comments ()
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    On Sunday, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins went to several homes near a possible shelter site to talk to residents about immigrant children coming to their neighborhood. There are mixed feelings in one Grand Prairie neighborhood about sheltering some of the 2,000 immigrant children at Lamar Alternative Education Center. (Published Sunday, Jul 6, 2014)

    With the prospect of 2,000 unaccompanied children coming to Dallas county in the coming weeks, NBC DFW learned of three new developments Sunday night.

    Planned Protest

    An anti-immigration protest is planned in Fort Worth. On Facebook, a group called "Protect Texas" said its rally will be part of a "national day of protesting against immigration reform amnesty and border surge."

    The protest is scheduled for July 19 at Heritage Trace Parkway and I-35W.

    Foster Parents

    On Monday and Thursday, Catholic Charities of Fort Worth will hold information sessions for people interested in possibly becoming foster parents to unaccompanied immigrant children.

    The sessions will take place July 7 at 1:00 p.m. and July 10 at 6:00 p.m. at Catholic Charities at 249 West Thornhill Drive in Fort Worth.

    Reaching Out to Residents

    On Sunday, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins went to several homes near a possible shelter site to talk to residents about immigrant children coming to their neighborhood

    There are mixed feelings in one Grand Prairie neighborhood about sheltering some of the 2,000 immigrant children at Lamar Alternative Education Center.
                
    “It doesn't bother me,” said Ricardo Camacho, who has lived across the street from the school for almost 30 years. “It’s OK with me.”
    “It’s going to overcrowd the neighborhood itself,” said Rebecca Parks.
    Parks is concerned about the age of the kids possibly coming to Lamar, just down the street from her home where she's lived for more than 30 years. 
    “If it's the littler kids, they’re not going to be as rambunctious as the teenagers,” said Parks.
    The age of the kids who might be sheltered at Lamar is still uncertain.
    On Sunday, Jenkins and elected Grand Prairie officials went to homes surrounding the school to hand out flyers with information and to get feedback from residents about bringing some of the 2,000 immigrant children to their neighborhood.
    “I think it's a good thing so they are not out running wild and they are sheltered,” said Parks’ daughter Elizabeth.
    Lamar is one of three locations named as a possible shelter. The others include DA Hulcy Middle School and an old hospital ware house near Parkland Memorial Hospital.
    There are still many questions that Dallas County leaders are trying to answer before they bring the kids to the Dallas area by the end of the month.
    “I need more information,” said Rebecca Parks. “I can’t really say I’m for it or against it until I have more information.”
    Judge Jenkins said federal contractors will be used as security at the sites. He says the children will not be allowed off the premises, and unauthorized people will not be allowed on it.