Arlington Parents Submit Transfers for Better Schools

More than 200 Arlington ISD Parents submitted transfer work for kids this morning.

View Comments ()
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    Parents in Arlington camped out in trailers and cars so that they could file transfer requests early Monday morning. (Published Monday, Feb 28, 2011)

    After camping out for days, parents in the Arlington Independent School District seeking transfers packed up and signed up for a new school.

    When the doors opened at 6 a.m., 200 parents were the first to submit paperwork to have their children transferred to a better school within Arlington ISD.

    Parents Camp Out for a New School

    [DFW] Parents Camp Out for a New School
    Parents in Arlington camped out in trailers and cars so that they could file transfer requests early Monday morning. (Published Monday, Feb 28, 2011)

    Diana Ham said she likes the school near her house but wants her son to go to a better school.  Ham also said she is prepared if he doesn't make it in.

    "If I don’t get into either [of the] two schools that I picked, he will go to the school district that we are in," she said. "I just want a good foundation for my son."

    The parents were placed on a waiting list, and the school district said there is no guarantee they will even get their wish because of the budget situation.

    "Normally the way the transfer process works, by this time we would already know what schools have what slots available," district spokeswoman Amy Casas said. "So normally parents get to this process, we would be able to get a slot at that school. But now because of budget and things facing with budget, we won't know that until June."

    The school district said it can't assign students on the transfer list until it figures out how many spots each school has open. The district does not yet know how teachers and students it will have next year or how many students will be in each classroom.

    The Arlington ISD is facing a potential $48 million budget shortfall. The state faces a revenue shortfall of at least $15 billion, and the Legislature is expected to slash education funding.