Arlington Dog Owner Faces Charges in Pit Bull Attack

"Lillian's Law" aimed at holding dog owners accountable for vicious animals

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Arlington Police
    Nancy Hayes, 30, was arrested on a charge of “attack by dog resulting in serious injury,” a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison.

    In one of the first such cases in North Texas, police say an Arlington dog owner faces up to 10 years in jail after her two pit bulls allegedly attacked a neighbor.

    Nancy Hayes, 30, was arrested on a charge of “attack by dog resulting in serious injury,” a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison.

    Pit Bull Owner Arrested in Dog Attack

    [DFW] Pit Bull Owner Arrested in Dog Attack
    The owner faces up to 10 years in one of the first ?Lillian?s Law? cases in North Texas. (Published Tuesday, May 4, 2010)

    Hayes is charged with violating “Lillian’s Law,” named after Lillian Stiles, a central Texas woman who was mauled by several dogs in 2005. The Legislature passed the measure, which is aimed at holding dog owners more accountable, in 2007.

    The victim of the Arlington attack said Hayes’ two pit bulls flew out an unlocked gate as he walked outside to his mailbox.

    “(There was) no warning,” said Robert Wallis, 66. "Every time I got halfway back up, I was pulled back down again."

    He said the dogs dragged him to the ground and bit him on his hand, arm, ankle and face.

    "All I could think of was (to) get up and keep them off of me,” he said.

    A passing letter carrier rushed to help him.

    "He came down and shooed them off,” Wallis said.

    One of the same dogs had been declared dangerous last summer after it attacked another man, police said. Hayes had promised to keep the animal restrained.

    "I think she brought it on herself,” he said. "People should be held accountable for when they have dangerous dogs."

    Wallis says his neighbor hasn't apologized for the attack or said anything to him since it happened April 22.

    "Not a word,” he said. "Not a word."

    The city euthanized the animals after the attack.

    When reached by telephone, Hayes declined to comment and hung up.

    She told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram she had raised the pit bulls since they were puppies and considered them good, lovable pets.