Measles Case Confirmed in Tarrant County

Patient lives in Northeast Tarrant County, had traveled out of state

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A Tarrant County resident has been diagnosed with measles after attending a softball tournament in Kansas where health officials later warned of possible exposure to the virus. (Published Wednesday, Jul 23, 2014)

    A Tarrant County resident has been diagnosed with measles after attending a softball tournament in Kansas where health officials later warned of possible exposure to the virus.

    Tarrant County Public Health confirmed the diagnosis Wednesday morning and said the patient lives in the northeast part of the county. As per usual, further specific patient information is not being disclosed.

    Measles Confirmed in Tarrant County

    [DFW] Measles Confirmed in Tarrant County
    The Tarrant County Health Department reports a patient has tested positive for measles in Tarrant County. (Published Wednesday, Jul 23, 2014)

    Texas Department of State Health Services spokeswoman Christine Mann said the person attended a July Fourth weekend softball tournament in Wichita, Kansas.

    Health officials on July 17 announced more than 30 people from Texas who traveled to the tournament may have been exposed to the measles virus. At least three recreational softball teams from Texas played in Wichita.

    On Tuesday, 11 cases of measles were confirmed by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. A report by The Wichita Eagle listed possible exposure points as a steakhouse, a hotel and the informal softball tournament attended by teams from several states including Texas.

    The TCPH department said public health officials are also tracing contacts, assessing immune status and offering immunization for those who have not had measles or previous vaccination, the department said in a news release Wednesday.

    "We know that measles is highly contagious and easily spreads by simply breathing, coughing, sneezing or coming in close contact with an infected person," said TCPH Chief Epidemiologist Russell Jones in a statement Wednesday. "We are advising local physicians and health care providers to consider measles in patients with compatible symptoms. If you or anyone you know develops symptoms of this disease, please check with your health care provider immediately."

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, measles, also known as rubeola, is a "highly contagious respiratory disease caused by the measles virus. Measles causes fever, runny nose, cough and a rash all over the body. About one out of 10 children with measles also gets an ear infection, and up to one out of 20 gets pneumonia. For every 1,000 children who get measles, one or two will die."

    On their website, the CDC said "adults can also get measles especially if they are not vaccinated. Children under 5 years of age and adults over 20 are at higher risk for measles complications including pneumonia, and a higher risk of hospitalization and death from measles than school aged children and adolescents."

    TCPH would like to remind residents that measles is a vaccine-preventable disease. Adults who have received a measles vaccine series are considered immune. Those who have not been immunized against measles, or have never had measles, should contact their health care provider.

    NBC 5's Chris Van Horne and Josh Ault contributed to this report.