Protesters Arrested as Demonstrations Heat Up Outside Venezuelan Embassy in DC - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth
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Protesters Arrested as Demonstrations Heat Up Outside Venezuelan Embassy in DC

By Wednesday night, power and water was cut off at the building and police were not letting anyone bring food inside

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    Clashes Intensify Outside Venezuelan Embassy

    One protester was arrested for trying to throw food through a window into the Venezuelan Embassy. Another woman was also handcuffed. News4's Jackie Bensen reports. (Published Wednesday, May 8, 2019)

    Protesters at the Venezuelan embassy in Washington were taken into custody Wednesday evening as demonstrations got heated.

    The embassy in Georgetown has become an unlikely flashpoint in the confrontation between populist Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro and U.S.-backed Juan Guaidó for political power in the South American country.

    Maduro invited American activists who see him as Venezuela's legitimate leader into the embassy a month ago as the United States and another 50 countries recognized Guaidó as president and severed ties with his government. After the embassy was officially closed, the diplomats left, but the activists stayed.

    By Wednesday night, power and water was cut off at the building and police were not letting anyone bring food inside.

    Armored Vehicle Runs Over Demonstrators in Venezuela

    [NATL] Armored Vehicle Runs Over Demonstrators in Venezuela

    A Venezuelan National Guard armored utility vehicle drove into a group of demonstrators Tuesday in Venezuela near a Caracas air base. Two demonstrators, whose heads and legs were left bloodied were driven away on a motorcycle. Clashes between the government and the anti-Maduro demonstrators broke out after opposition leader Juan Guaidó urged an uprising.

    (Published Tuesday, April 30, 2019)

    A man was arrested for trying to throw food into an open window at the embassy. Video showed the bloodied protester sitting on the ground wearing handcuffs after a struggle with officers.

    Officers were seen putting handcuffs on another protester who was wearing a shirt representing Code Pink, one of the organizations at the embassy supporting Maduro.

    Outside the embassy, Venezuelan expatriates have been protesting the activists' presence inside the embassy.

    President Donald Trump's administration has said the activists are trespassing Venezuelan sovereign territory and need to leave. Gustavo Vecchio, Guaidó's appointee as ambassador to Washington, has said he's signed all necessary documents and it is now up to U.S. authorities to clear the building.

    The activists created a so-called Venezuela Embassy Protection Collective, hanging giant posters from the roof and keeping a busy schedule of conferences, concerts, poetry recitals and other events.

    The Venezuelan expatriates started showing up in big numbers after an uprising against Maduro failed last week.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)

    It's unclear how many people the U.S. Secret Service took into custody Wednesday.