'Black Panther' Fever Hits North Texas, Inspires Youth - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

'Black Panther' Fever Hits North Texas, Inspires Youth

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    'Black Panther' Fever Hits North Texas, Inspires Youth

    A new Marvel movie "Black Panther" has prompted local civic groups, churches and schools to donate stacks of tickets to black youth around North Texas (Published Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018)

    The wait is over. The highly-anticipated new Marvel movie “Black Panther” is set to open in wide release across North Texas.

    The movie marks the first super hero film with a predominantly black cast set in Africa.

    The film is expected to break records, but also barriers. It has prompted local civic groups, churches and schools to donate stacks of tickets to black youth around North Texas.

    “There are only three things that a troubled kid needs: significance, responsibility and privilege,” Rev. Kyev Tatum said. “If you place those three things into their lives as you are trying to grow them, they are going to begin to feel good about themselves.”

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    Tatum will bring a group of Fort Worth kids to see the movie thanks to a donation from the Regional Women’s Chamber of North Texas.

    “Access, exposure and opportunity [are important]. The more access you get to positive opportunities, the more exposure you see outside your traditional norm, the better chance you’re going to have to have an opportunity to succeed,” Tatum said.

    “People have always wanted to have something they can identify with [and] this represents hope. It reflects something bigger,” Grammy winning gospel singer and Fort Worth native Kirk Franklin said at a Dallas VIP screening of the film.

    Many in the black community hope the film and its cast will inspire local youth to great heights and dreams.

    “I just want them to be able to see a snapshot of themselves. When you can see yourself doing supernatural things, then you are able to take that power and believe that you have a supernatural ability as well,” Franklin said.

    “Self-image is very important when you always see yourself casted in a negative light. You’re either rejected – a suspect or a subject. You tend to begin to have internalized racial inferiority,” Tatum said. “You see yourself less than and you begin to act that out.”

    Fandango reports that "Black Panther" has already outsold all other superhero films in pre-sale tickets.

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