At Least 50 Swift-Water Rescues in Dallas This Year | NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

At Least 50 Swift-Water Rescues in Dallas This Year

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    NEWSLETTERS

    When storms are approaching Dallas, the Swift-Water Rescue Team at Dallas Fire-Rescue Station 34 prepares for a busy time. (Published Monday, Nov. 16, 2015)

    With the water rising in North Texas creeks late Monday, the swift-water rescue team at Dallas Fire-Rescue Station 34 was preparing for a busy night ahead.

    "We'll have knives and a few little tools," said firefighter Charlie Abney, going through his gear. "We're going to have special shoes that have holes in them that are designed for water rescues."

    Abney said 2015 has been one of the busiest for this team. According to Dallas Fire-Rescue, this year his crew has responded to at least 50 swift-water rescue calls.

    Out of the 50 rescues, the following locations have their highest incident calls:

    • 3 incidents on the 1400 block of California Crossing Road
    • 3 incidents on the 7300 block of West Kiest Boulevard
    • 3 incidents on the 2300 block of Middlefield Road
    • 2 incidents on the 1680 block of West Northwest Highway
    • 14 incidents at White Rock Lake/White Rock Trail areas

    "We've had boat rescues, we've had where we've had to use ropes and rescue them, just throwing bags to people," Abney said.

    Abney said a few inches of rain the area around White Rock Lake can flood in a matter of minutes.

    "I've had to drive this boat in that White Rock Creek area trail when a flash flood came up. It's actually where the running trail was that had flooded up several feet," he said.

    Abney said the top reasons people get stuck is they attempt to drive through water that covers a road or are playing or walking near high water and it overtakes them.

    "When it flash floods, it's rising very quickly. In a matter of minutes you could be right next to it and then all of a sudden you're in it," Abney explained.

    He said the best thing to do is not take a chance and avoid driving through water that covers a road.

    He said you never know what's underneath the water, which way the water could take you and how fast the water can rise around you.

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