Racy "Scouting Report" Rates Yale's Freshmen Co-eds

Some students outraged at crude e-mail

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    Yale University students are upset about a email circulating around campus.

    Someone has ranked 53 incoming Yale freshmen women based on how many beers it would take for guys to find them attractive and sent out an e-mail with what’s called the "The Preseason Scouting Report."  

    The e-mail sender was anonymous, but whoever it is, is causing some outrage on the ivy-league campus less than a week into the school year.

    Racy Freshmen Women "Scouting Report" Angers Yale

    [HAR] Racy Freshmen Women "Scouting Report" Angers Yale
    Someone has ranked 53 incoming Yale freshmen women based on how many beers it would take for guys to find them attractive.

    The rating system uses words like "sobriety, " five beers," or "10 beers," and women say the feel victimized and university officials are trying to track who sent the e-mail.

    Freshman Karen Molokoch found out about the e-mail from a suite mate and said she does not want to see it.

    "I wouldn't give the list that kind of attention because that would show that it has some kind of significance," she said.

    “It seems like it would be extremely upsetting to have that come out like that, just the way they were rated was pretty offensive,” Alice Walton, a Yale student, said.

    “I totally thought high school cattiness was over, I though I escaped all that coming here. I mean it was definitely shocking,” Farlah Kahn, another Yale student , said.

    Despite the hard feelings over the letter, Michael Jones, a junior, doesn't think the letter reflects poorly on Yale.

    "They're college kids. Everybody is entitled to a mistake. I just hope the list doesn't hurt anyone who's on it," Jones said.

    Yale administrators are not sure if there will be a punishment.

    The list is not the first time Yale students have been fodder for salacious publications.

    Last year, several students found themselves on the Web site Juicy Campus, a collection of gossip from campuses across the country, where anyone could make obscene and sometimes slanderous comments.