Badu in the Buff

Dallas singer releases music video shot "guerilla style" in Dealey Plaza

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    In her controversial new music video, Erykah Badu strips and falls to ground in Dealey Plaza.

    Dallas native Erykah Badu's new music video portrays her taking off her clothes and then dying near where President John F. Kennedy was assassinated.

    The "guerilla-style" video for the song "Window Seat" was shot in one take as she stripped while walking in Dealey Plaza on March 17. Badu released the music video Saturday.

    "I was petrified while shooting this video ... but liberation began to set in. I conquered many fears in that few moments," Badu posted on Twitter on Sunday.

    Families can be seen in the background. Badu said on Twitter that she prayed the children who were there wouldn't be "traumatized."

    Dallas Singer's Nudity in Music Video Raises Eyebrows

    [DFW] Dallas Singer's Nudity in Music Video Raises Eyebrows
    Some are offended by the Erykah Badu video that depicts her stripping at the site of President Kennedy's assassination.

    The video begins with a 1963 radio broadcast describing Kennedy turning onto Elm Street. Badu is then shown in a parked car. Then she walks toward Elm Street while taking her clothes off.

    Badu said on Twitter that she could hear people yelling things at her but she kept going. People were yelling things such as "This is a public place," "You ought to be ashamed," and "Put your clothes on," she said.

    She said the people caught in the background were trying to ignore her as she shed the last of her clothing -- except for one man who grabbed her clothes.

    In the video, she falls to the ground at the spot where Kennedy was shot.

    The blood at the end of the video spells out "groupthink."

    Groupthink is "the unwritten rule that states; I will not express my true opinion if it opposes those I love and fear. I volunteer to censor me," Badu wrote on Twitter.

    Badu, a mother of three, said on Twitter that she told her children about her plans to film the video. Her 5-year-old daughter just asked for another serving of pudding. Her 12-year-old son said he would tell anyone who teased him about the video that his "mom is great" and "she was having fun."

    "I immediately took myself less seriously," Badu posted.

    The city of Dallas said in a statement that Badu's production company did not get permits or contact the city. Commercial film, video and photo shoots must be approved by the city. Guerilla videos are usually shot in one take because the crews know they would face arrest or penalties if they are caught, the city said.

    Badu said she made sure to put money in the meter in case the police showed up.

    "After last action, we ran like hell! lol," she posted on Twitter.

    She said they didn't even take the time to look for the man who was picking up her clothes.

    Dallas police said they do not plan on filing charges against Badu, who lives in Dallas. But the department said it would consider filing indecent exposure charges if witnesses came forward.

    No one in Dealey Plaza at the time of the filming called police, Dallas police said Monday.

    Badu's latest album, "New Amerykah Part Two: Return of the Ankh," will be released Tuesday.