Recession-Proof Jobs

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    Getty Images

    No job is 100 percent secure, but there are some careers that do better than others during economic downturns.

    Not long ago, Angela Dillen was working in the mortgage division of a major bank.  After 15 years, she was out of a job.

    "I am a single mom, looking for something long-term, stability and profitable for me to be able to support me and my daughter," said Dillen.

    Recession-Proof Jobs

    [DFW] Recession-Proof Jobs
    No job is 100 percent secure, but there are some careers that do better than others during a recession.

    Dillen decided to open a Massage Heights franchise in Keller last December.  Dillen said each week business is getting better and better.

    "A lot of the customers come in for medical reasons," said Dillen. "When they come in they're hurting. But when they leave, they feel good and that's nice."

    Dillen said she chose this business because she thought it would be "recession-proof." After all, the great stressed-out masses have to relax somewhere, right?

    If you are looking for more job security, experts said there are several career fields that tend to weather economic turbulence well.

    Hospital and healthcare positions top the list -- Nurses, physical therapists, pharmacists and the like.

    Consultant Susan Steinbrecher said information technology, accounting and education also tend to be more secure.

    "The big picture here is to think, 'What are the types of things that no matter what happens people still have to do, right?'" said Steinbrecher. "Even with these recession proof occupations, theres still some downsizing in those fields. It's still much better than a lot of the ones out there."

    But before making a big career change or spending a lot of money on new training, Steinbrecher recommends doing some soul searching.

    "I think the worst thing you can do is jump from one to another just because you hear that's one that seems to be more protected right now," said Steinbrecher. "You may have no ability, skill or interest in that."

    Dillen did her soul searching and now believes she has found her future.