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Giancarlo Stanton Deal Engulfs Rangers Payroll

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    PHOENIX, AZ - JULY 07: Giancarlo Stanton #27 of the Miami Marlins bats against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the MLB game at Chase Field on July 7, 2014 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Giancarlo Stanton

    To attempt to grasp the absurdity of the contract given to the Marlins’ Giancarlo Stanton, let’s start here:

    Every day – for the next 13 years – he will earn $68,449. The average American this year will earn a salary of $53,891. After a short pause to fetch your barf bag, I’ll further detail the $325 million deal – richest, riskiest sports contract in the history of North America.

    Stanton is a obviously a beast, and one of the strongest, most feared hitters in all of baseball. But he hasn’t stepped into a batter’s box since being hit in the face by a pitch on Sept. 11. As we know, there are examples in baseball history where players never psychologically recover from such a traumatic experience.

    Even if he fully recovers and returns to hitting 40 homers a year, can he possibly be worth eight times as much as Josh Hamilton was to the Rangers in 2010?

    In his MVP season, Hamilton made $3 million. Stanton next year will begin making $26 million per year. It’s preposterous, until you consider that the Rangers paid Prince Fielder $24 million in 2014 for a whopping three homers and 16 RBI.

    Stanton’s total deal, by the way, exceeds the Rangers’ team payroll for 2013 and 2014 … combined.

    A native Texan who was born in Duncanville and graduated from UT-Arlington, Richie Whitt has been a mainstay in the Metroplex media since 1986. He’s held prominent roles on all media platforms including newspaper (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Dallas Observer), radio (105.3 The Fan) and TV (co-host on TXA 21 and numerous guest appearances, including NBC 5). He currently lives in McKinney with his wife, Sybil, and two very spoiled dogs.