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Romo Not Worried About Arm Soreness

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    Tony Romo hit an expected stage after nine days in training camp. The Dallas Cowboys quarterback has a sore right throwing arm.

    "I've got to watch it just because you don't want it to stay like that for an extended period of time," Romo said after practice Sunday. "We started today just watching it a little bit."

    Romo first started feeling the soreness Saturday, and started cutting back on his throws then. He said it is nothing to worry about.

    "It happens every year. ... It's just part of the process," Romo said. "When I was young, I would just keep throwing and keep getting worse, and keep missing and figure there was some technical aspect."

    While Romo has no plans to take a break, he has cut back by throwing fewer passes during the warmup session. He uses the passing drills without defenders to stretch out his arm more.

    Beside that, it is ice and rest as much as possible.

    "The coaches are great if it's too sore and you don't want to throw, I know that they are allowing me to have that option," he said. "But we've got a lot of stuff to work on, so we will keep grinding."

    There was a bit of a break Sunday morning when none of the veteran starters had to take part in the first of two practices. The rookies and backup players took part in the morning workout before a full-squad session without pads in the afternoon.

    Romo expects his arm to be feeling better within a couple of days. The Cowboys play their preseason opener next Sunday night against Cincinnati in the Hall of Fame game at Canton, Ohio.

    "If you do it the right way, it's usually about a two- or three-day thing and you can kind of get back a little bit and go from there," Romo said. "It's really part of every season and I'm sure probably just about every quarterback goes through it."