Humans Killed Off the Biggest Land Mammals, Not Climate Change: Study - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth
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Humans Killed Off the Biggest Land Mammals, Not Climate Change: Study

"Wild mammals are in decline globally because of a lethal combination of human-mediated threats," the researchers wrote in the journal Science

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    Humans Killed Off the Biggest Land Mammals, Not Climate Change: Study
    AP
    In this May 3, 2017, photo, a ranger takes care of Sudan, the world's last male northern white rhino, at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia county in Kenya. Sudan, has died after "age-related complications," researchers announced Tuesday, March 20, 2018, saying he "stole the heart of many with his dignity and strength."

    Humans have steadily driven the world's biggest land mammals into extinction for thousands of years, and we're not done — the cow could soon be the largest one left, according to a new study.

    NBC News reported that the study, published Friday in the journal Science, concludes that human activity, not climate change, is what drove animals like the mammoth and saber-toothed tiger extinct.

    Today, hunting leaves little hope for saving large, wild mammals from extinction, according to the researchers led by biologist Felisa Smith of the University of New Mexico.

    "Wild mammals are in decline globally because of a lethal combination of human-mediated threats, including hunting, introduced predators and habitat modification," the researchers wrote.

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