McKinney Father Survives Widow-Maker Heart Attack - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

McKinney Father Survives Widow-Maker Heart Attack

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    McKinney Father Survives Widow-Maker Heart Attack

    Doctors in Allen say at 34-years-old, Vicente Torres was one of the youngest major heart attack patients they had ever treated. (Published Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018)

    Heart attack can strike at any age and some people don't know they're at risk for one until it's too late.

    34-year-old Vicente Torres, of McKinney, never thought twice about his risk until he suffered a heart attack that nearly killed him.

    The father of one considered himself "fat-fit:" overweight, but still active.

    "We did river trips, hiking, bike riding, just anything to be active and outdoors," said Torres.

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    The day before Father's Day of this year, Torres experienced sudden and severe chest pains and says he was nauseous and vomiting repeatedly.

    He says he felt the heat leaving his body.

    "What was worse than the pain was that cold feeling. To me, it was like, if you could feel what death feels like, that's what it feels like," said Torres.

    He was having a widow-maker heart attack. 100% of his widow-maker artery was blocked. He underwent a stent procedure at Texas Health Allen.

    "He very well could have died from this, however, he showed up in a timely manner, so we were able to fix his vessels in a timely fashion," said Dr. John Lee, Cardiologist, Texas Health Allen and Texas Health Physicians Group.

    Dr. Lee says Torres was the youngest major heart attack patient he'd ever treated and while heart attacks are rare in young patients, Torres's story has an important message.

    Torres didn't know he had uncontrolled diabetes, a major risk factor for heart attack.

    "One of the things you should know is your family history because that is one of the risks for heart disease and it's an important to see your doctor on a regular basis so they can obtain labs and know what risks factors are hidden," said Dr. Lee.

    Torres now exercises regularly, follows a strict diet and take medication.

    Since his heart attack he's lost 30 pounds and is embracing what he considers a second chance.

    "Everything that I have learned and experienced is something that I can teach others," he said.

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