Storm System to Bring More Rain to Parched Texas

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Chief Meteorologist David Finfrock updates the forecast for Tuesday, May 27, 2014.

    More rain is on tap for much of Texas as an upper-level atmospheric disturbance continues to drift slowly over the state.

    The National Weather Service issued a Severe Thunderstorm Watch for 39 Texas counties including the entire Dallas-Fort Worth area until 11 p.m.

    Meteorologists said some storms could produce large hail and damaging winds as well as locally heavy rain.

    A flash flood watch will remain in effect over Central and Southeast Texas through Tuesday morning and into the afternoon. The rain Tuesday comes after a Memorial Day of heavy rain, hail and weak tornadoes in West, Central and Southeast Texas.

    The upper-level disturbance drifted into the Texas Panhandle on Monday, combining with Gulf moisture to triggering heavy rain across Southeast Texas and drought-parched Central Texas, along with severe thunderstorms with occasional tornadoes across arid West Texas.

    Upward of 6 inches of rain was detected in the South Plains, Concho Valley, Hill Country and Edwards Plateau of West Texas. Those downpours closed numerous low-water crossings but brought at least short-term relief to areas of West Texas worst-affected by intractable drought. Also, 1 to 1 1/2 inches of rain fell in a drought-parched belt from Vernon to Lubbock.

    The National Weather Service received reports of weak tornadoes scattered from Midland to San Angelo and near Wharton on the coastal plain and Bastrop in Central Texas. Minor damage was reported, but no injuries.