Homeowners Drowning in Flood Aftermath

On October 23, when a 27-inch water main at the Pierce Burch water treatment plant

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Contractors and city not sure who's to blame for the October water main break that still affects flood victims. (Published Wednesday, Dec 28, 2011)

    Two months and two days after three homes were flooded when a water main broke at an Arlington city facility, homeowners say the wait for repairs has been exhausting.

    "No repairs yet and no sign of any repairs coming," said Carol Cash.

    Homeowners Battle Arlington Over Water Main Break

    [DFW] Homeowners Battle Arlington Over Water Main Break
    Contractors and city not sure who's to blame for the October water main break that still affects flood victims. (Published Wednesday, Dec 28, 2011)

    Cash's home was one of three damaged on October 23, when a 27-inch water main at the Pierce Burch water treatment plant broke sending water down a hill into three homes in the 4500 block of Hillside Drive.

    The city offered temporary housing, but Cash and her neighbors said for weeks they've been asking who would fix their homes.

    "First the city was telling us the contractor's insurance was going to take care of us and then we all got letters that that wasn't the case," said Cash.
     
    Ark Contracting Services, hired by the city to do work at the water facility, said there was disagreement between their insurers and the city's over who was at fault.

    Stuck in the middle, homeowners recently filed a lawsuit against Ark Contracting Services. Steve Bowman with the Ark said the company hoped to have the issue resolved for the homeowners soon.

    "We're just taking it day by day and we're not real sure at this point," said Cash.

    Bowman said insurance and mold assessors have already visited the homes.

    "There's a lot of costs still accumulating. You've got your utility bills, lights all night long which we didn't do in the past. They had to remove parts of the walls, with those cut out it's drafty so our heat is running constantly," said Cash.

    Homeowners say worse than the financial burden, is the daily reminder of the flood.

    "It's difficult looking out your back door, walking through your house every day and seeing what the damage is and you're not getting anywhere," said Cash.

    Cash said she's trying to not let the flood fight dampen her spirit.

    "I've really prayed about it a lot and I think God put us in this place for a reason and there's going to be a good outcome to this – I know there has got to be," said Cash.

    The city of Arlington, who is not involved in the lawsuit, declined to comment on the pending litigation.