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Why Jerry Jones Isn’t Dan Snyder

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    NEWSLETTERS

    I don’t mean to take away from the Cowboys mini-revival going on right now. But my goodness, do you see what’s going on in Washington right now? That team is a train wreck. A giant, twisted, flaming train wreck, with smoke billowing miles up into the sky. You can see the wreckage from the top of JerryWorld, it’s such a disaster. The reports get worse by the hour. Fans are irate. Signs have been banned. The team seems to have six different mouthpieces, all of whom are lying and in complete denial simultaneously. There will be pitchforks and torches. Oh, will there be pitchforks and torches.

    It’s quite the mirror image from Valley Ranch, which has been the picture of tranquility over the past week or so. In fact, from way back in the offseason, Jerry Jones has taken great pains to stress stability within the Cowboys organization. Most of the controversy swirling around the Cowboys has stemmed from external frustration over the team’s early performances. But the team itself has remained relatively calm and resolute.

    There are a handful of owners in the NFL who will easily be termed as “meddling.” At the top of the list, naturally, are the Double J, Al Davis, and Danny Snyder. But while you may have your issues with Jerry Jones, I think we can all agree that, as meddling owners go, he is far and away superior to Snyder. Everything Snyder and his right-hand-man Vinny Cerrato do reeks of amateurism. It’s often as if two 13-year-old boys are in charge of the Redskins. And while the Double J can be rather… impulsive, the man does have some true football credentials to fall back on.

    Those two franchises mirror each other in many ways. Both have a rich history and multiple Lombardis on the trophy shelf. Both are in the midst of a rather extended championship drought. Both have experienced a great deal of coaching turnover and have starting QB’s that occasionally cause fans to want to commit seppuku (though let it be made clear that Tony Romo is a far better QB than Jason Campbell). But of those two, only the Cowboys appear to have their act together. This is a maddening team at times, but it is not a team without hope. The same can’t be said for the Redskins. As long as Dan Snyder is treating the team like a doll he enjoys bashing against the wall, the Double J will always look like a relatively sane alternative.