Today is Deadliest Day on Road for Teens

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    AP
    A teenage driver sits behind the wheel.

    May 20 is the deadliest day for American teens on the road, claiming 63 percent more lives on average over the past five years, according to crash data from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

    A recent survey of more than 1,000 teen drivers (margin of error +/-3 percent) indicated that texting while driving is a teen driver's largest distraction behind the wheel. More than 49 percent of teens reported texting while driving, up from 31 percent the year before.  According to Allstate, about 82 percent of teens report using cell phones while driving.

    To hopefully curb the deaths of thousands of teen drivers and passengers, Allstate Insurance has launched a Facebook Page to where drivers can pledge to not send text messages while driving their car.

    More than 60 percent of teen passenger deaths occur in vehicles driven by another teen.  A recent survey conducted by Allstate Insurance indicated that only 53 percent of girls reported they would say something in a dangerous situation on the road compared to 66 percent of boys. Additionally, more than 75 percent of teens admitted to feeling unsafe when in the car with another teen driver.

    Those are heavy thoughts as we approach the time between Memorial Day and Labor Day, also known as the "100 Deadliest Days" for teen drivers. In those summer months, on average, 15 teens die every day in traffic-related crashes.

    In addition to the online pledge to end texting while driving, Allstate also recommends parents and teens sign a teen driver contract that will allow parents to set guidelines, establish expectations and discuss consequences for rule violations. 

    More boys, 41 percent compared to 31 percent of girls, said that their parents enforce teen driving laws.