Hotline Helps Those Depressed Over Japan Disaster

Increase in calls expected for local Crisis Hotline

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Disturbing images from Japan are triggering depression in some North Texans.

    Seeing the tsunami tearing through entire cities, followed by the threat of a nuclear meltdown, can be devastating for some.

    "Every time you talk to them, all they are doing is watching television or listening to the radio about this. Those are major signs that you need to be concerned," said Benaye Rogers, president of CONTACT.

    CONTACT is a nonprofit, free counseling service available for anyone who is having a tough time coping with a crisis, such as the one in Japan.

    Crisis Center Helping Those Cope With Japan Disaster

    [DFW] Crisis Center Helping Those Cope With Japan Disaster
    Some North Texans say they too are overwhelmed and watching the devastation unfold in Japan is leaving them feeling helpless.

    "It's increasing anxiety for people who have daily anxiety anyway, and for those who suffer with depression, it's just one more thing on top of, you know this, is another thing to be depressed about -- that the world is just not getting better," said Rogers.

    Rogers said signs of depression to watch for include people who isolate themselves, sleep too much or don't sleep at all.

    She advises anyone who is experiencing these signs to talk to someone and express their feelings if they are feeling down. Volunteering and making a donation to a charity can also make a person feel like they are contributing, making that person feel better.

    But Rogers said the biggest advice is to have hope.

    "Life does go on. People do move forward, and the thing that we have to remember is not too stand still. We have to be thinking about where we are going to go. Hope is possible. Sometimes we have to look for it, but it's there," said Rogers.

    The crisis hotline is available 24 hours per day, seven days a week.

    CONTACT Crisis Hotline by phone at 972-233-2233 or online at www.contactcrisisline.org.