robins

Here's Why You're Seeing More Robins in North Texas

NBC 5 viewers have noticed a large number of robins (and other birds) looking for food and refuge during a harsh week of winter in North Texas

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You've probably noticed even more activity from birds, after our deep freeze, particularly robins.

NBC 5 viewers shared photos and videos of a large number of robins looking for food and refuge during a harsh week of winter in North Texas.

NBC 5 viewers have noticed a large number of robins looking for food during a harsh week of winter in North Texas.

You can see from the video above, viewers captured robins in Haltom City, North Richland Hills, Keller, Colleyville, Euless and other cities.

Kevin wrote in and said thousands of birds descended on their berry tree in North Haltom City on Tuesday and stripped it bare of berries in a matter of minutes.

It was amazing to watch! Glad our tree could feed the hungry birds looking for food during this winter storm," he said.

Robins Flock to North Texas and Ride Out Frozen Week With the Help of Berry Trees

Dogwood Canyon Audubon Center in Cedar Hill posted on its Facebook that we are seeing more robins migrating to Texas this winter as part of an irruption, which occurs as robins migrate in massive numbers to find food.

During a Facebook live video Audubon center educator Katie Christman explained if you want to make sure you have plants to support birds in cold winter months you want to consider hollies, junipers, dogwoods, beauty berries and sumacs. The Audubon center sells native berry plants during a sale each spring and fall.

Robins, which are known for eating worms, switch to fruit and berries in the winter.

And if you want to help birds out, the Audubon center says to look for dried mealworms, which provides protein, not just for robins but all birds.

Also consider high-quality bird seed-- not bread!!

MORE: Dogwood Canyon Audubon Center

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