Melanoma Monday: Know the UV Index and Help Prevent Skin Cancers - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth
Weather Connection

Weather Connection

Melanoma Monday: Know the UV Index and Help Prevent Skin Cancers

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    NBC 5 Forecast: One More Decent Chance for Rain
    Getty Images

    May is Skin Cancer Awareness month. According to skincancer.org, five million people are diagnosed with skin cancer each year in the United States, making it the most common cancer in the U.S.

    The UV Index is available inside the NBCDFW App -- it can be found by going to the weather page and then by clicking on the day of the week.
    Photo credit: NBC DFW

    To help you avoid harmful exposure to UV radiation you can find the UV index on our website (mouse over the day of the week in the 10 Day Forecast section) and app.

    A number between 1 and 11+ will be posted daily. Here is what the numbers mean (source EPA):

    • 0 to 2: Low danger from the sun's UV rays. Wear sunglasses on bright days. If you burn easily, cover up and use broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen.
    • 3 to 5: moderate risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Stay in shade near midday when the sun is strongest. If outdoors, wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses. Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating.
    • 6 to 7: high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Protection against skin and eye damage is needed. Reduce time in the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses. Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating.
    • 8 to 10: very high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Take extra precautions because unprotected skin and eyes will be damaged and can burn quickly.
    • A UV Index reading of 11 or more: extreme risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Take all precautions because unprotected skin and eyes can burn in minutes.

    If you don't know the UV Index and easy way to tell how much exposure from the sun you are getting is by looking at your shadow. If your shadow is taller than you are (in the early morning and late afternoon), your UV exposure is likely to be lower.

    If your shadow is shorter than you are (around midday), you are being exposed to higher levels of UV radiation.