Get Permission Before Dancing Your "I Do" - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Get Permission Before Dancing Your "I Do"

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    Not all churches are down with you getting down in the wedding aisle.

    The Web may be flooded with videos of wedding parties dancing down the aisle or turning the dance floor into an old Michael Jackson video, but before you decide to do the hustle at your nuptials, you might want to check with your church.

    The "JK Wedding Entrance Dance," the famous YouTube video with more than 12 million views, happened in a Minnesota Lutheran santuary. However, not all places of worship are hip on the idea of a bride and groom cutting a rug in church.

    "I think the Metroplex is big enough that you're going to find a few willing to -- within reason," said Kay Watson, a North Texas wedding planner. "I know what churches not to call."

    Southern Methodist University's Perkins Chapel and Dallas' First Baptist are two of those churches. Staff at both told NBCDFW.com that dancing in the sanctuary was not allowed.

    Get Permission Before Dancing Your "I Do"

    [DFW] Get Permission Before Dancing Your "I Do"
    Not all churches are down with you getting down in the wedding aisle.
    (Published Friday, July 31, 2009)

    Frisco newlyweds Christine and Dusty Hall did a medley dance at their reception, but they didn't dare dance in the church at their Catholic wedding.

    "No, not in church," Dusty Hall said. "They wouldn't have let us."

    "We had to get floral arrangements approved," his wife said.

    But the couple said they were fine with that idea, because they wanted to keep their nuptials traditional.

    Pastor Anne Cameron, of Lake Highlands Presbyterian Church, said she's open to the idea of church members getting married and dancing down the aisle.

    "It's an act of worship, and worship can involve dance; worship can involve secular music," she said. "I can imagine that there are other Presbyterian Churches and other Christian churches that would say, 'Absolutely not.'"