Boston Review Poetry Editors Resign After Magazine Retains Junot Diaz Amidst Misconduct Claims - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

Boston Review Poetry Editors Resign After Magazine Retains Junot Diaz Amidst Misconduct Claims

Diaz, a Pulitzer Prize winner, was accused of sexual misconduct not long after he authored a piece in The New Yorker in April

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Boston Review Poetry Editors Resign After Magazine Retains Junot Diaz Amidst Misconduct Claims
    Andrew Toth/Getty Images for The New Yorker
    Writer Junot Diaz attends "The Jersey Boys: David Chase, Junot Diaz, and Sam Lipsyte moderated by David Remnick" in this October 2014 file photo.

    Three Boston Review editors resigned after the magazine chose to keep fiction editor Junot Diaz on the staff despite accusations of misconduct and misogyny that surfaced in May.

    Diaz, a Pulitzer Prize winner, was accused of sexual misconduct not long after he authored a piece in The New Yorker in April that detailed his encounters with sexual assault as a child. In a letter, editors in chief Deborah Chasman and Joshua Cohen wrote that they hadn’t received any complaints during Diaz’s 15-year stint with the publication.

    The letter also said Diaz’s behavior “does not have the kind of severity that animated the #MeToo movement.”

    The letter left poetry editors Timothy Donnelly, BK Fischer and Stefania Heim, whose resignations are effective July 1, outraged, NBC News reported.

    Woman, 93, Rescued From Camp Fire by Her Garbageman

    [NATL] Woman, 93, Rescued From Camp Fire by Her Garbageman

    Margaret Newsum, 93, had no idea that the Camp Fire was rapidly approaching her Magalia home until her caretaker left for the day and she turned on the television. She was quickly rescued by her friend Dane Ray Cummings, who decided to break company policy and rescue Newsum with his Waste Management truck. KCRA reports.

    (Published Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018)

    “What most distresses us are the letter’s apparent arbitration of what constitutes inclusion in the #MeToo movement and its lack of attentiveness to power dynamics in a star-driven media and publishing landscape,” the editors said in a statement.