<![CDATA[NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth - National & International News]]>Copyright 2018https://www.nbcdfw.com/news/national-internationalhttp://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/NBC+5-KXAS+Logo+for+Google+News.pngNBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worthhttps://www.nbcdfw.comen-usFri, 16 Nov 2018 04:20:49 -0600Fri, 16 Nov 2018 04:20:49 -0600NBC Owned Television Stations<![CDATA[Dartmouth Sued Following Professor Misconduct Allegations]]>Fri, 16 Nov 2018 03:19:36 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/180*120/515044559.jpg

A class-action lawsuit filed by a group of former and current Dartmouth College students described the climate three professors allegedly created as a "21st-century Animal House."

The Boston Globe reports the lawsuit accuses Paul Whalen, Bill Kelley and Todd Heatherton of sexual misconduct and creating a disruptive party atmosphere.

The federal lawsuit against Dartmouth's trustees was filed in New Hampshire on behalf of seven students Thursday. It claims the three psychology professors sexually harassed and abused scores of female graduate students for years, including two who said they were raped.

Drinking and hot-tub parties were hosted by the trio and the educators would have lab meetings at bars, according to the complaint. The professors allegedly groped female students, made sexual advances to them numerous times and sexually assaulted graduate students.

According to the complaint, the professors delayed exams, expressed their control over the students’ academic careers and threatened to defund research grants to female students who rejected their sexual advances.

The lawsuit states the university did not protect the students. Whalen and Kelley resigned before the school took action and Heatherton retired.

Dartmouth denies the allegations that it ignored complaints about the professors.

College spokesman Justin Anderson said the school took the appropriate steps to investigate the professors after they were first accused of sexual misconduct in April 2017. The school claims it was prepared to take action against the professors before they departed.

Whalen and Kelley couldn't be reached for comment. Heatherton apologized for acting inappropriately at conferences but said he never socialized or had sexual relations with students.

The New Hampshire Attorney General's Office conducted a criminal investigation into the three professors last year. The students are seeking $70 million in damages, according to the lawsuit.

Last year, 15 undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral students wrote to the university's newspaper that the three professors created a hostile academic environment where "sexual harassment is normalized."



Photo Credit: Getty Images/National Geographic Creative]]>
<![CDATA[3 Charged in GoFundMe Scheme; 14,000 Donors to Be Refunded]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 23:51:59 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/DAmico+Bobbitt+McClure+mugshots+tri.jpg

The New Jersey couple and a homeless veteran at the center of a long-running $400,000 GoFundMe controversy have been charged with conspiracy and theft by deception for an alleged scheme that "hoodwinked an awful lot of people," authorities said Thursday.

GoFundMe said immediately after charges were filed that all 14,000 donors to the campaign last year would be refunded in full.

NBC10 first reported that Johnny Bobbitt Jr. and the South Jersey couple, Kate McClure and Mark D'Amico, would all face criminal charges of conspiracy and theft by deception on Thursday for the GoFundMe campaign that began in 2017.

Burlington County, New Jersey, Prosecutor Scott Caffina alleged the three conspired with one another to make up a story and raise more from online donors. The GoFundMe campaign garnered national headlines and news segments, eventually raising more than $400,000.

Authorities believe the three met at least a month before the campaign was launched, possibly on one of many trips McClure and D'Amico made to SugarHouse Casino.

Bobbitt was homeless and often stayed near an Interstate 95 off-ramp near the casino.

Caffina said that, within hours of the three launching the campaign on the GoFundMe website last November, McClure texted a friend that the majority of the story was fabricated.

"Ok, so wait. The gas part is completely made up. The guy isn't," McClure allegedly texted the friend after the campaign went live Nov. 10 with a photo of a smiling McClure and Bobbitt.

"So shush about the made up stuff," she added, according to Caffina.

D'Amico and McClure turned themselves in Wednesday to Burlington County prosecutors, the source said. On Thursday, James Gerrow, another attorney for McClure, released a statement on her behalf.

“I’m confident that in the end the evidence will reveal that Kate had only the best intentions," Gerrow said. "She was used by Mr. D’Amico and Mr Bobbitt and she thought throughout that this money was going to a homeless veteran. She was unaware that they had concocted this scheme. It wasn’t until September when meeting with prosecutors that she came to realize that she had been used by both of them.”

The backbone of the story was that Bobbitt used $20 to help McClure get gas when her car ran out on I-95 at the Girard Avenue exit. McClure and D'Amico then launched a GoFundMe page to supposedly raise money for Bobbitt, and the page brought in over $400,000 from 14,000 contributors.

At first, the account led to appearances for Bobbitt and McClure on national TV programs. But it turned into a dispute over the money.

Bobbitt accused the couple of dipping into the funds and using them as a "personal piggy bank" to bankroll a lifestyle they couldn't afford.

Bobbitt later sued the couple over mismanagement of the funds and a judge ordered sworn statements to determine what happened to the cash, which Bobbitt's attorney, Chris Fallon, said had disappeared.

The couple denied any wrongdoing and accused Bobbitt of spending $25,000 in less than two weeks last year on drugs as well as paying for overdue legal bills and sending money to family.

The couple's lawyer, Ernest Badway, later said Bobbitt had gotten about $200,000. But Fallon said his client had received only about $75,000.

The couple also bought Bobbitt a camper with some of the cash and parked it on land McClure's family owns in New Jersey. But Bobbitt became homeless again after D'Amico told him in June that he had to leave the property.

In September, police raided the couple's home in Florence, New Jersey, hauling away a new BMW on a flatbed truck. Badway said that all the couple's personal and business financial statements, along with jewelry and cash, were seized in the raid.

At that point, officials said the couple was under investigation, though no charges had been filed.

D'Amico was arrested in September in Burlington County on an unrelated $500 warrant for an October 2017 traffic stop, according to officials. At the time, he was driving on a suspended license and also had a broken tail light. He also failed to appear in court on two separate occassions, according to court records.



Photo Credit: Burlington County Prosecutor's Office
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<![CDATA[Toddler Towed With Car, Left in Freezing Lot Overnight]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 14:58:17 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/215*120/Screen+Shot+2018-11-15+at+9.50.02+AM.png

A 4-year-old girl was left alone inside a minivan overnight in a Milwaukee tow lot, authorities said. An impaired driver was pulled over and arrested for operating while intoxicated. Officers removed a 10-month-old child from the vehicle but left the 4-year-old girl, who spent the night in the tow lot where temperatures dropped to 19 degrees.

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<![CDATA[How to Help Victims of California Wildfires]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 12:33:08 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/180*120/GettyImages-1059649988.jpg

Dozens of people have died and tens of thousands of Californians have been forced from their homes as massive wildfires continue to rage in the northern and southern ends of the state. 

The Camp Fire in Northern California's Butte County has become the most destructive and deadliest wildfire in recorded state history. The Woolsey Fire north of Los Angeles, meanwhile, has killed at least two killed and wiped out hundreds of structures.

Here are some ways to help those impacted by the wildfires:

DONATIONS
Anyone who wants to help can text "CAWILDFIRES" to 90999 to make a $10 donation to support RedCross disaster efforts.

GoFundMe has also set up a page with fundraising campaigns for victims of the fires in both northern and southern California.

Donations can also be made through the Salvation Army.  

North Valley Community Foundation is accepting monetary donations as well as supplies.

Caring Choice, a nonprofit in Chico, is accepting donations to help offer relief to those affected by recent Northern California Fires. You can make a note in the memo whether you prefer your donation be used for, food, clothing, housing or other things.

Among supplies needed are paper products (toilet paper, forks, spoons, paper plates, tissues, paper towels), and women's undergarments, as well as warm clothes, including shoe and socks, Butte County officials said.

The North Valley Animal Disaster Group is taking care of animals and is accepting donations. Call ‪530-899-3873‬ or visit this site for more information.

United Way of Greater Los Angeles has started a disaster relief fund for victims of the Hill and Woolsey fires. Similarly, United Way of Northern California has set up an option on its donation for page for people to put money toward Camp fire relief.

The Los Angeles Fire Department Foundation has also put out a call for donations to raise money to purchase hydration backpacks for firefighters. Donations can be made online at the organization's website

AirBnb was looking for host homes to open their spaces for evacuees of the Woolsey and Hill Fires through Nov. 29. More than 850 homes throughout the SoCal region, including dozens in San Diego County, were available.

Those wishing to volunteer should fill out an application and wait for instructions. Notarized applications are required. Contact Caring Choices by calling 530-899-3873 or visiting them at 1398 Ridgewood in Chico. 

AT&T was waiving charges for those affected by the fires. See more information here. T-Mobile, Sprint and Verizon are offering a similar deal, with more information available on their websites.  

T-Mobile support trucks were also to be in the greater Ventura area Monday and Tuesday to help those affected by the Woolsey fire. They would provide connectivity, USB cables, chargers, battery packs, masks and toiletries. See more information here.

Additionally, NBC Los Angeles has a Southern California wildfires Facebook group with local information on ways to help. 



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[GOP Sen. Hyde-Smith Calls Voter Suppression 'Great Idea']]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 20:46:13 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/211*120/HydeSmithVoterSuppression.jpg

A video surfaced Thursday of Republican Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith of Mississippi saying it might be a "great idea" to make it harder for some people to vote, and her campaign quickly responded that she was "obviously" joking, NBC News reported.

Hyde-Smith, who is in a runoff against Democrat Mike Espy on Nov. 27, made the remark at a campaign stop in Starkville, Mississippi, on Nov. 3. It was posted to Twitter on Thursday by Lamar White Jr., publisher of The Bayou Brief. Smith earlier this week posted video of Hyde-Smith making a comment on Nov. 2 about a "public hanging" that started a controversy.

"And then they remind me that there's a lot of liberal folks in those other schools who ... maybe we don't want to vote," Hyde-Smith is heard saying. "Maybe we want to make it just a little more difficult. And I think that's a great idea."



Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Pentagon Says It 'Failed' Its First, Massive Audit]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 18:31:27 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/shanAP_18199606133606-%281%29.jpg

The Defense Department has failed an audit almost three decades in the making, the Pentagon's No. 2 official said Thursday. But the results were expected and showed what the agency already knew — that "more work lies ahead of us."

Congress first required the Defense Department to undertake a comprehensive audit in 1990, but the agency didn't manage to get around to it until late last year, NBC News reported.

"Everyone was betting against us that we would even do the audit," Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan told reporters, adding: "It was an audit on a $2.7 trillion organization. The fact we did the audit is substantial."



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Here's What Congress' Criminal Justice Reform Bill Would Do]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 20:49:36 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/211*120/TrumpCriminalJusticeReform.jpg

President Donald Trump’s support has put Congress within reach of passing the most sweeping set of changes to the federal criminal justice system since the 1990s, when fear of crime drove the enactment of draconian sentencing practices that shipped hundreds of thousands of drug offenders to prison.

This is no small feat. Reformers have been trying to get this done for years, but something always got in the way: partisan bickering, election-year politics, ambushes by opponents. Amid Washington gridlock, the First Step Act stands out.

The measure, which could go to a vote during the lame-duck session of Congress between now and January, contains several changes to the way the federal government treats drug offenders, both those who are in prison now and those who will face a judge in the future, NBC News reports.



Photo Credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[63 Dead, 631 People Unaccounted For in Camp Fire]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 22:32:24 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/Fires4.jpg

Sixty-three people are dead and 631 unaccounted for in the Camp Fire in Northern California. As firefighters continue to battle that blaze, the Woolsey Fire is also still burning in Southern California.

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<![CDATA[Engagement Ring Survives California Wildfire]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 15:50:46 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/NC_ringfoundcampfire_1920x1080.jpg

A Paradise, California man has found a glimmer of hope among the ashes of his parents' home that was recently destroyed in the Camp Fire.

On Wednesday, Nick Maes combed through the burnt rubble searching for a safe. Inside: an engagement ring he planned to give to his girlfriend of two years.

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<![CDATA[5 Years Later: Revisiting Batkid's Crime-Fighting Day in SF]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 12:50:04 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/214*120/Batkid10.JPG

Five years after bringing swift justice to Gotham-themed San Francisco as Batkid, Miles Scott is enjoying a much more typical life for a 10-year-old boy.

Back in 2013, the shy youngster and leukemia survivor from Tulelake, California, captivated the Bay Area and beyond, busting criminals in the city by the bay, rescuing the San Francisco Giants mascot and earning a key to the city as part of his day-long Make-A-Wish Foundation experience.

Scott, now 10 and in the fifth grade, has taken a break from his crime-fighting duties to return to school, play baseball and help out on his family's farm, according to Make-A-Wish, the nonprofit organization that grants dream-come-true wishes to children suffering from critical illnesses. 

Undoubtedly the best part of Scott's young life is the fact that he's been in remission from leukemia for the last five years, according to Make-A-Wish. He was first diagnosed with the cancer at the age of one.

While Scott enjoys his normal life nowadays, his life was anything but five years ago Thursday. Donning his Batkid mask, a flowing cape and an all-black superhero ensemble, Scott stymied villains such as the Riddler and the Penguin to the cheers of thousands of people who crowded the streets of San Francisco to partake in the wish.

Scott's memorable day received the attention of, among others, the San Francisco Chronicle, which transformed its front page to showcase the wish, and even then-President Barack Obama, who delivered a special message via Vine to the crime-fighting boy.

More than 16,000 people RSVP'd to volunteer to help with the spectacle, according to Make-A-Wish. The number of tweets featuring the hashtags #SFBatkid or #Batkid soared beyond 545,500. The entire phenomenon was said to be discussed in at least 117 countries. 

Scott's monumental day was so illustrious it inspired a full-length documentary coined "Batkid Begins: The Wish Heard Around the World."



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[WH Weighs Extraditing Erdogan Foe to Appease Turkey: Sources]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 12:18:26 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/AP_17316428097732.jpg

The White House is looking for ways to remove an enemy of Turkish President Recep Erdogan from the U.S. in order to placate Turkey over the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, two senior U.S. officials and two other people briefed on the requests told NBC News

Trump administration officials last month asked federal law enforcement agencies to examine legal ways of removing exiled Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen in an attempt to persuade Erdogan to ease pressure on the Saudi government, the four sources said. Gulen has been living in Pennsylvania since the late 1990s.

Career officials at the agencies pushed back on the White House requests, the U.S. officials and people briefed on the requests said. 

"At first there were eye rolls, but once they realized it was a serious request, the career guys were furious," said a senior U.S. official involved in the process. 

The FBI and a spokesman for the National Security Council declined to comment, as did a lawyer for Gulen. The departments of state, justice and homeland security did not respond to requests for comment.



Photo Credit: Chris Post/AP, File]]>
<![CDATA[NJ GoFundMe Couple, Homeless Man Made Up Story, Source Says]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 13:42:07 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/DAmico+Bobbitt+McClure+mugshots+tri.jpg

EDITOR'S NOTE: The newest version of this story can be found here, including the confirmed arrest and extradition of Johnny Bobbitt Jr. by Philadelphia police on Wednesday night. It will also host the livestream of a 2 p.m. press conference by prosecutors making a major announcement in the case at Old Burlington County Courthouse.

The New Jersey couple who became famous for raising hundreds of thousands of dollars for a homeless man after he helped with their disabled car — as did the homeless man himself — will all face charges for allegedly providing a false story in order to raise money for themselves, a source familiar with the case told NBC10.

Mark D'Amico, Kate McClure and Johnny Bobbitt Jr. will face charges including conspiracy and theft by deception, according to the source.

A complaint obtained by NBC10 alleges that the three conspired with one another to make up a false story in order to raise more than $400,000.

Investigators say the three deliberately prevented donors for their GoFundMe campaign from gaining information "that would affect their judgment about solicited contribution to that fundraising effort."

D'Amico and McClure turned themselves in Wednesday to Burlington County prosecutors, the source said. The source did not confirm whether or not Bobbitt turned himself in as well.

A lawyer for the couple had no comment Thursday. NBC10 has also reached out to a lawyer for Bobbitt for comment.

The three initially gained fame in 2017. The couple claimed Bobbitt used $20 to help McClure get gas when her car ran out on Interstate 95 in Philadelphia. McClure and D'Amico then launched a GoFundMe page to supposedly raise money for Bobbitt, and the page brought in over $400,000 from 14,000 contributors.

At first, the account led to appearances for Bobbitt and McClure on national TV programs. But it turned into a dispute over the money.

Bobbitt accused the couple of dipping into the funds and using them as a "personal piggy bank" to bankroll a lifestyle they couldn't afford.

Bobbitt later sued the couple over mismanagement of the funds and a judge ordered sworn statements to determine what happened to the cash, which Bobbitt's attorney, Chris Fallon, said had disappeared.

The couple denied any wrongdoing and accused Bobbitt of spending $25,000 in less than two weeks last year on drugs as well as paying for overdue legal bills and sending money to family.

The couple's lawyer, Ernest Badway, later said Bobbitt had gotten about $200,000. But Fallon said his client had received only about $75,000.

The couple also bought Bobbitt a camper with some of the cash and parked it on land McClure's family owns in New Jersey. But Bobbitt became homeless again after D'Amico told him in June that he had to leave the property.

In September, police raided the couple's home in Florence, New Jersey, hauling away a new BMW on a flatbed truck. Badway said that all the couple's personal and business financial statements, along with jewelry and cash, were seized in the raid.

At that point, officials said the couple was under investigation, though no charges had been filed.

D'Amico was arrested in September in Burlington County on an unrelated $500 warrant for an October 2017 traffic stop, according to officials. At the time, he was driving on a suspended license and also had a broken tail light. He also failed to appear in court on two separate occassions, according to court records.



Photo Credit: Burlington County Prosecutor's Office
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<![CDATA[List of North Korean Nukes Not Needed for 2nd Summit: Pence]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 06:24:39 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/penceAP_18319182289564.jpg

North Korea will not be required to provide a complete list of its nuclear weapons and missile sites before a second summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Vice-President Mike Pence told NBC News Thursday. 

The U.S. has pressed the North for information on the entirety of its nuclear operations since an initial agreement for denuclearization on the Korean Peninsula was reached in June. But the Kim regime has refused to provide details of the nation's operations and postponed scheduled meetings with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in New York last week. 

Now, the second summit between the two leaders — slated for after the New Year — will be where a "verifiable plan" to disclose the sites and weapons must be reached, Pence said. 

This week, a report from the Center for Strategic and International Studies outlined a number of missile operating bases that the North Koreans have continued to develop since the Trump-Kim summit five months ago.



Photo Credit: Bernat Armangue/AP
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<![CDATA[2 Navy SEALs, 2 Marines Charged With Murdering Green Beret]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 14:00:05 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/SSG-Melgar1.jpg

Two elite Navy SEALs and two Marine Raiders were charged with felony murder in the June 2017 strangulation death of U.S. Army Green Beret Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar, NBC News reports.

The U.S. Navy brought the charges against the four service members on Tuesday, painting a gruesome picture of the effort to kill Melgar, 34.

The suspects are accused of driving to Marine quarters to obtain duct tape, breaking into Melgar's room while he was sleeping, restraining him with the duct tape, and strangling him in a chokehold. The four U.S. service members, which include two members of the famed SEAL Team Six, killed Melgar "while perpetrating a burglary," according to their charge sheets.

In addition to felony murder, the charges against the four men include conspiracy, obstruction of justice, hazing and burglary.



Photo Credit: U.S. Army]]>
<![CDATA[Camp Fire Leaves Small California Town in Ashes]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 12:50:25 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/179*120/P1130824.JPGThe Camp Fire ripped through Paradise, leaving the small Butte County town in shambles. The wildfire is the deadliest and most destructive blaze in California history.]]><![CDATA[Donovan the Stubborn Horse Stands His Ground During SoCal Fire]]>Fri, 16 Nov 2018 00:04:27 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/Horse_Rescue_Malibu_Woolsey_Fire_1200x675_1371420227685.jpg

Donovan tends to do things on his own terms.

The white horse who lives on a ranch in the hills above Malibu was rescued from a rough life of mistreatment about a dozen years ago in Sacramento, which explains why he's always been leery of humans.

So, it wasn't a surprise to Wendell Phillips, whose wife runs Spunky’s Rescue Ranch, that Donovan didn't budge when flames from the 98,000-acre Woolsey Fire started licking at the Decker Canyon property. The wind driven inferno advanced so quickly Friday that Phillips realized there was not enough time to round up all their rescues.

"I let the horses go and opened the house up and opened the sanctuary up so everybody would have a chance," said Phillips, a retired Sacramento County Sheriff's deputy, now attorney, who brought Donovan along when the family relocated south to the ranch.  In his rear view mirror, he could see the flames over-running the ranch even as he was reaching the end of his driveway.

The ranch house and much of the ranch infrastructure was consumed by the fire, Phillips discovered when he was able to return a day after the firestorm.  But it lifted his spirits to see that his strategy to help the animals had succeeded.

He found Donovan there on the hillside in his usual spot, his white coat standing out against the charred landscape.

"He's got a couple little burns on his nose and his tail's a whole lot shorter than it used to be," Phillips observed with relief that Donovan had escaped more serious harm.  Donovan's favored spot had fortuitously been munched free of vegetation, giving him open space that did not burn when the fire came through.

Many of the smaller animals and three of Donovan's fellow equine rescues at Spunky's had also survived, Phillips said.  The other three horses quickly agreed to a trailer ride to a large animal evacuation center, but not stubborn Donovan.  Phillips has put out food and water for him, and returns every day to check on him, awaiting assistance in tranquilizing Donovan to be able to transport him out of the burn zone.

And there's more good news. In the wake of the destructive fire, with Sheriff's deputies patrolling the neighborhood, one who noticed the gelding told Phillips she has a friend who wants to adopt Donovan.

"Going to have a happy ending" for Donovan, said Phillips.

As of Thursday morning, the Woolsey Fire had scorched through 98,362 acres and was 57 percent contained. It has destroyed an estimated 504 structures and damaged another 96.

Three deaths have been reported in connection with the fire.



Photo Credit: KNBC-TV]]>
<![CDATA[Professor Sues Over Transgender Pronoun Rebuke]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 10:01:19 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/Screen+Shot+2018-11-15+at+9.47.55+AM.png

A Shawnee State University professor is suing officials after receiving a written warning for violating its nondiscrimination policy by not addressing a transgender student using the gender terms preferred by the student. Nicholas Meriwether, a philosophy professor and evangelical Christian, filed a federal lawsuit this month against officials at the university in Portsmouth. 

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<![CDATA[5 Dead in Wintry Weather Before Storm Heads to East Coast]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 09:24:10 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/AP_18318803058748-Mississippi-Casino-Bus-Crash.jpg

A pre-winter storm was being blamed for five deaths as it spread icy conditions on roads in the South and Midwest on Wednesday before it hits the Northeast Thursday, NBC News reported.

Two people were killed and several dozen hurt when a tour bus headed to a casino overturned in Mississippi. In Arkansas, three people died in separate crashes on icy roads, prompting authorities to shut Interstate 40 overnight.

A winter weather advisory covered more than 89 million people up the East Coast from Washington, D.C., as officials prepared for storm damage.

Tens of thousands of people were without power in Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio.



Photo Credit: Adrian Sainz/AP]]>
<![CDATA[Text Messages Show Roger Stone, Friend Discussing WikiLeaks' Plans]]>Thu, 15 Nov 2018 08:11:09 -0600https://media.nbcdfw.com/images/213*120/AP_17269628729551-Roger-STone.jpg

Trump confidante Roger Stone was told that Hillary Clinton's "campaign will die this week" six days before WikiLeaks began releasing her campaign chairman's emails, according to copies of text messages Stone provided to NBC News.

The message came from Stone's friend, radio host Randy Credico, who told Stone he had insights into WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange's plans through Assange's lawyer.

The messages show that Credico appeared to be providing regular updates to Stone on Assange's plans ahead of the release of the hacked emails that changed the trajectory of the 2016 presidential campaign.

Stone is a focus of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation, sources have said. Stone has denied colluding with WikiLeaks and said the messages he shared support his claim that his only information on WikiLeaks came from Credico.

Credico told NBC News that the messages don't show he "had any knowledge of anything that Assange was going to do because I didn't."



Photo Credit: Andrew Harnik/AP, File]]>