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Number Of Illnesses From Bug Bites On The Rise

We are a month into the mosquito season and Tuesday, some alarming news from the CDC.

Illnesses from mosquito, tick, and flea bites have tripled in the U.S., with more than 640,000 cases reported during the 13 years from 2004 through 2016.

The CDC also says in its report that nine new germs spread by mosquitoes and ticks were discovered or introduced into the United States during this time.

Widespread and difficult to control, diseases from mosquito, tick, and flea bites are major causes of sickness and death worldwide.

The report found that the nation needs to be better prepared to face the public health threat posed by the growing number and spread of these diseases.

“Zika, West Nile, Lyme, and chikungunya-are a growing list of diseases caused by the bite of an infected mosquito, tick, or flea-have confronted the U.S. in recent years, making a lot of people sick. And we don’t know what will threaten Americans next,” said CDC Director Robert R. Redfield, M.D, in a press release from the CDC.

“Our nation’s first lines of defense are state and local health departments and vector control organizations, and we must continue to enhance our investment in their ability to fight against these diseases.”

Many local municipalities have begun preparations for mosquito season, which runs from April through November.

On Tuesday, crews were walking one of the 37 creeks in Bedford, spraying larvaecide to standing water, trying to stop the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses, like zika and the most common in North Texas, West Nile Virus.

"It's just going to be a constant battle every year. You just got to prevent it, get started right away and try to hit it before it gets out of control," says Jerry Laverty, manager of the street and drainage department.

The city of Frisco tells NBC 5 it has increased trapping sites for the second in a row.

The city now has 17 trap sites spread across the city, as it continues to focus on disease management, versus nuisance management, which means its surveilling for diseases that mosquitoes spread.

Arlington has begun its robust mosquito surveillance program, announcing proactive measures to stay on the front lines of the mosquito battle.

We are a month into the mosquito season and Tuesday, some alarming news from the CDC.
Illnesses from mosquito, tick, and flea bites have tripled in the U.S., with more than 640,000 cases reported during the 13 years from 2004 through 2016.  
The CDC also reprots nine new germs spread by mosquitoes and ticks were discovered or introduced into the United States during this time.
Widespread and difficult to control, diseases from mosquito, tick, and flea bites are major causes of sickness and death worldwide. 
The report found that the nation needs to be better prepared to face the public health threat posed by the growing number and spread of these diseases.
“Zika, West Nile, Lyme, and chikungunya-a growing list of diseases caused by the bite of an infected mosquito, tick, or flea-have confronted the U.S. in recent years, making a lot of people sick. And we don’t know what will threaten Americans next,” said CDC Director Robert R. Redfield, M.D, in a press release from the CDC. 
“Our Nation’s first lines of defense are state and local health departments and vector control organizations, and we must continue to enhance our investment in their ability to fight against these diseases.” 
Many local municipalities have begun prepartions for mosquito season, which runs from April through November.  
On Tuesday, crews were walking one of the 37 creeks in Bedford, spraying larvaecide no standing water, trying to stop the spread of mosquito born illnesses, like  zika and the most common in North Texas, West Nile Virus.
"It's just going to be a constant battle every year.  You just got to prevent it, get started right away and try to hit it before it gets out of control," says Jerry Laverty, manager of the street and drainage department.
The city of Frisco tells NBC 5 it has increased trapping sites for the second in a row.  
The city now has 17 trap sites spread across the city, as it continues to focus on disease management, versus nuisance management, which  means its surveilling for diseases that mosquitoes spread.
Arlington has begun its robust mosquito surveillance program, announcing proactive measures to stay on the front lines of the mosquito ba
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