water usage

North Texas Municipal Water District Lifts Extreme Winter Weather Conservation Measures

According to the The North Texas Municipal Water District, water demands are returning to normal levels

NBC 5 News

The North Texas Municipal Water District has lifted its request to curtail or limit non-essential water use within its service area.

The District said it has been able to consistently produce enough treated water to meet the water demands over the past several days.

"It was a true regional effort," Billy George, North Texas Municipal Water District Assistant Deputy of Water, said. "We asked the cities and water utilities we serve as well as residents and business to help by limiting water use for essential needs only while crews worked non-stop to increase treatment and distribution capacity. We have completed major assessments and are undergoing critical repairs, but we are back at normal operating levels for this time of year. The coordinated regional effort to respond to the extreme weather even has been exceptional by all involved."

With extreme weather conditions throughout North Texas during the week of Feb. 14, the North Texas Municipal Water District experienced high water demands that outpaced its ability to refill city water storage tanks at the rates requested, the District said.

The North Texas Municipal Water District said its Wylie Water Treatment complex normally sees winter water demands from the entities it serves at around 250 million gallons of water per day.

With the extreme weather and the loss of power for many North Texans, those demands increased to over 350 million gallons of water per day in a very short timeframe, the District said.

The North Texas Municipal Water District said crews also dealt with frozen systems which hampered efforts to increase treatment capacity to meet the high demands.

Cities and water utilities who purchase water from NTMWD also experienced frozen infrastructure and power outages which in some cases prevented their ability to receive water supplies, the District said.

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