North Texas

Frisco Says Tests Show Water is Safe Despite Some Citizens' Doubt

The city's statement came two days before Brockovich plans to hold a meeting about water concerns in North Texas.

City officials say tests show Frisco’s water is safe amid a week when doubtful North Texans plan to meet with environmental activist Erin Brockovich.

Eight “extra” water quality tests were conducted March 26 by an independent laboratory, city officials said in a statement Tuesday.

They tested for trihalomethanes, which are disinfection by-product chemicals that show up such as after chlorine is used. March 26 was the last day of the “chlorine maintenance period” by the North Texas Municipal Water District, city officials said.

The statement came two days before Brockovich plans to hold a meeting about water concerns in North Texas.

The North Texas Municipal Water District system has been under fire since March when Brockovich shared a Facebook post telling people that the treatment used, which involves chlorine and ammonia, can cause health concerns. The NTMWD has denied the claims.

The tests done at eight locations in Frisco showed levels averaged 80.1 parts per billion, city officials said. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality says the maximum contaminate level is an average 80 ppb over one year and the commission tests quarterly, city officials said.

"Any single water sample test result (or set of results) may register higher," said Kevin Grant, Assistant Director of Public Works. "However, as long as the yearly average is at or below 80 (ppb), the water quality is considered safe and no action is required."

The trihalomethanes tests over the last three quarters averaged 44.8 ppb, city officials said.

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