Collin County Property Tax Appraisals Hit Mailboxes

In Collin County, homeowners are already starting to protest their latest property tax appraisals. The notices hit mailboxes this week and some are not waiting to start their appeal.

“I did get here quick,” said Pat Robinson, who owns a home near Anna in Collin County.

Robinson came to the Collin Central Appraisal District office Wednesday, looking for an explanation behind the $51,920 increase on her home’s taxable value over last year.

“I don’t know where they get their numbers. I don’t know how they come up with this stuff and that’s why I’m here to find out,” said Robinson.

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Preliminary numbers show the taxable value in Collin County, overall, increased by about 7.5% over last year. The certified values are determined later in the summer.

But communities like Princeton, Celina, Melissa and Anna saw overall values increase by double digits: 11% to just over 19%.

“It’s similar in places like Princeton, Anna, Celina, some of the areas that have started to grow over the last few years,” said Chief Appraiser Bo Daffin. “A lot of that is driven by new construction.”

Daffin said his office is interpreting the transactions in the housing market to help assess homes values. He adds demand for housing in Collin County continues to put pressure on prices.

“We are asked that question: Where does it stop? How high will the values go? My answer is: I don’t know,” said Daffin. “As an appraiser, I‘m trying to interpret what buyers and sellers have done and are currently doing - as opposed to trying to predict what they may do two years, three years into the future.”

Property owners have until May 15 to protest.

Last year, Daffin said there were just over 72,000 protests. The office sent out approximately 350,000 notices. The year before that, the office logged a little more than 60,000 protests.

“This is the time of year those appraised values need to be under focus and under scrutiny to be reviewed by each individual owner to make the determination of whether they want to protest, whether they want to pursue it informally, or whether they believe that value is correct,” said Daffin.

He recommends home owners gather information to help determine the value of their home that may include: repair estimates, photos of damage or foundation cracks, engineering studies and sales contracts.

Property owners can go to the Collin Central Appraisal District office for an informal review with an appraiser and can file a protective appeal while undergoing the review process.

More information about Collin County's process can be found here.

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