coronavirus

Some Campuses Go Virtual as More Schools Across the Area See Rising COVID-19 Cases

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Students at Timber Creek High School in Keller are the latest to make the switch to virtual learning as the number of COVID-19 cases inside the school force the district to close its doors.

“I can’t learn for crap on a computer. I need the structure of that building I need the teachers right there to help me out," said student Aden Spearman.

But with cases rising across Tarrant and Denton Counties closing schools from Krum to Saginaw, the health director said these are calls that had to be made.

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“I give kudos to these schools they’ve been so prepared, but they got an enemy in this virus it’s so overwhelming, sometimes the numbers are so big they have no choice to shut down," said Dr. Vinny Taneja, Director of Tarrant County Health.

Taneja who was not allowed to close buildings before school started is back in the driver's seat now, as specific numbers of cases rise. From Dallas to Denton County schools say they’re seeing the number of cases quickly shoot up.

Dr. Robin Ryan in the Grapevine-Colleyville Independent School District sent a letter to parents Tuesday warning, "if virus spread continues to increase we may have to close individual schools.”   

“I know my kids take it seriously, they not living in fear, they listen to the science, they listen to their mom. They are cautious but I know there are parents who are sending kids to school sick," said parent Ashley Evridge.

No matter the cause, parents at at Timber Creek are counting on a conclusion.

“They were all closing, Fossil Ridge did it first so that helps they haven’t had that many outbreaks either. Hopefully, that helps like it did Fossil Ridge,” said parent Selina Trujillo.

Most experts we’ve talked to said schools have done a good job of keeping things under control, it’s everything else from extracurricular activities to parties and family events that make it tough for schools to keep the virus out. 

"The majority of cases have been the result of people being infected from exposure off-campus, then coming to school, just as their illness begins, exposing others," said Taneja.

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