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Authorities Prepare for Increased Lake Levels

Tropical Storm Bill is expected to drop several inches of rain on North Texas soon and some area lakes are still closed because of high water.

Lake levels have receded since peaking in May, but Army Corps of Engineers officials said they're preparing for more record highs.

"What we hope to do is be able to contain the waters in the flood control reservoirs to reduce the impact downstream," James Murphy, with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

With several inches of rain from Tropical Storm Bill expected, authorities say they’re preparing for rising lake levels.

Authorities have been releasing water from spillways, such as the one at Lake Grapevine. Murphy said they're ready to release more water as needed.

"Part of flood control, you're always preparing for the next flood," Murphy said. "We've been releasing the water as conditions have allowed."

The approaching rain is also a concern for anyone living close to a lake, river or stream. Some roads are still closed from previous storms and up to six additional inches of rain are expected.

Lake Lewisville is still more than a foot-and-a-half above flood stage, and water is being released through the spillway into the Elm Fork of the Trinity River.

Nearby, John Deitchman already has his hands full. He lives above Timber Creek, which was hit hard more than two weeks ago. He explained how he has already lost land.

"All this was about four feet out two weeks ago and now we have lost all this land. This whole curvature was not here. It was straight across,” he said, pointing to the drop from his yard, down to the creek.

Now, he thinks it's a matter of time.

"The house is going to go in. There is no question about that," said Deitchman.

His neighbor, Stephanie Whittemore, is not taking any chances.

"I know the worst of the flooding in the house was up to two feet, so I am going to put everything up to three feet, and have an emergency bag ready," said Whittemore.

NBC 5's Jeff Smith and Julie Fine contributed to this report.

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