Parents Want to Form All Boys Volleyball Team in the Dallas ISD - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Parents Want to Form All Boys Volleyball Team in the Dallas ISD

A group of boys and their parents are hoping to start an all boys volleyball team in their school district.

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    Parents Want To Form All Boys Volleyball Team In Dallas ISD

    The start of the school year also means the start of school sports, and there's a push from some parents in the Dallas Independent School District to form a new team. (Published Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018)

    What to Know

    • A group of parents in the Dallas Independent School District are hoping to form an all-boys volleyball team.

    • Currently, there is not a boys volleyball option offered, and the UIL restricts boys from playing on the girls team.

    • Parents believe volleyball offers a non-contact sport option for boys to play in the fall.

    The start of the school year also means the start of school sports, and there's a push from some parents in the Dallas Independent School District to form a new team.

    Julie Walter's son likes to play volleyball, and so do many other boys in his neighborhood. 

    "He loves it and it's super fun, and once he started playing, all of a sudden all his friends starting playing," said Walter. 

    The only problem is that currently there is not a boys volleyball option offered in the DISD. The UIL restricts boys from playing on the girls team, which means the boys are left to play outside of school at a private club. 

    Laurie Bruscato is the owner and director of the Dallas Starlings Volleyball Club, and coaches the boys team. 

    "We started last year with our first ever boys volleyball team and there's overwhelming interest now," said Bruscato. "I can only imagine Dallas-Fort Worth wide how popular it could be and give these boys other opportunities, because not every boy is cut out for every sport that participates in the fall." 

    Bruscato said there are also other benefits to allowing boys to play the sport, including collegiate scholarships.

    "These boys love it, but if they're not seen and they can't play, and they're not seen by college level coaches, then there's no opportunity for them," said Bruscato. 

    Walter said she is not trying to change UIL rules surrounding the sport.

    "We're not trying to take away anything from the girls, we don't want to put the boys on the girls team, we want them to have a separate opportunity, another option of something to play," said Walter.

    Walter and Bruscato are planning to work with the district to find out what options are on the table to start the boys volleyball team.