Eaglet Spotted in Bald Eagle's Nest Moved Away From Electric Lines - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

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Eaglet Spotted in Bald Eagle's Nest Moved Away From Electric Lines

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Eaglet Spotted in Bald Eagle's Nest Moved Away From Electric Lines
    NBC 5 News
    An eaglet has been spotted in a relocated bald eagle's nest in Seagoville.

    Oncor Electric Delivery says the relocation of a bald eagle's nest is a complete success after an eaglet was spotted inside.

    The 200 pound nest in Seagoville was moved last summer after it was discovered inches away from a 345 kV high-transmission line.

    “Just one instance of contact between the line and a grounded surface, like the tower itself, and we may not have any eagles,” said KayLynne Phillips, Oncor environment specialist.

    Oncor worked with Falcon Steel and the John Bunker Sands Wetland Center to build a new tower 1,000 feet away from transmission lines where the nest would be relocated when the eagles left for the season.

    After a delay when the eagles returned earlier than expected, the nest was moved last summer.

    "The two day project included the careful removal of the entire transmission tower arm that housed the nest. The arm was put on a flatbed truck, rolled to the new tower, and hoisted and secured," Oncor said in a statement Tuesday.

    When the eagles returned in the fall, they tried to rebuild their nest at the old location. They eventually realized their old nest was a short flight away and again took up residence.

    Now, in the spring, an eaglet has been spotted in the nest.

    “There was really only a 50-percent chance that the adult eagles would return to their nest in the new location. When they were spotted in it a few months later, we were thrilled,” said Phillips. “There was an even smaller chance the pair would breed successfully right away. The sighting of this eaglet is surreal.”

    "Because bald eagles nest in the same place for life, this new life is the ultimate success and paves the way for a safe and secure habitat for future generations of this majestic bird," Oncor said in a statement Tuesday.