Department of Justice Reviewing Actions Of Dallas Police Officers - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Department of Justice Reviewing Actions Of Dallas Police Officers

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Department of Justice Reviewing Actions Of Dallas Police Officers

    The Department of Justice is reviewing the death of a Dallas man who died while being restrained by Dallas Police in 2016 after calling 911 for help. (Published Friday, Aug. 10, 2018)

    The Department of Justice is reviewing the death of a Dallas man who died while being restrained by Dallas Police in 2016 after calling 911 for help.

    32-year-old Tony Timpa died of cardiac arrest due to a combination of the stress of restraint and cocaine use, according to the medical examiner.

    Three officers were indicted on misdemeanor charges in connection with Timpa’s death but so far the case has not been prosecuted.

    "I know my son is a good boy and I know he begged for help and I know he called for help," Vicki Timpa, Tony’s mother said.

    Colorado Man Charged With Five Counts of Murder in Deaths of Wife and Daughters

    [NATL] Colorado Man Charged With Five Counts of Murder in Deaths of Wife and Daughters

    Christopher Lee Watts was charged with five counts of murder Monday for the deaths of his wife Shanann Watts and their two daughters Bella and Celeste. Watts had initially pleaded publicly that his wife and daughters had gone missing. Their bodies were discovered on the property of the oil and natural gas company Watts worked for. The D.A. said that it's "too early" to discuss whether prosecutors would seek the death penalty.

    (Published Monday, Aug. 20, 2018)

    Vicki Timpa says she remains skeptical and additional federal review will bring any closure and believes the truth has been purposefully obscured by police and prosecutors.

    "You call 911 for help and you die… in Dallas," she said.

    Dallas Police Association President Mike Mata says he feels sorrow for the family of Timpa but believes the officers did nothing wrong. Mata believes a federal review will ultimately support his belief.

    "There finding is going to be exactly what we already knew this man was killed because of a high long term induction of drugs,” Mata said.

    Get the latest from NBC DFW anywhere, anytime

    • Download the App

      Available for IOS and Android