Dallas Mom Creates Award-Winning Food Truck in Son's Honor - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Dallas Mom Creates Award-Winning Food Truck in Son's Honor

SoulGood was recently named best food truck in the city by the Dallas Observer

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    Dallas Mom Creates Award-Winning Food Truck in Son's Honor

    Cynthia Nevels started to create meatless dishes for her son who was battling cystic fibrosis. She said she hoped that she could help him through the only thing that she could change -- his diet. While Tyler didn't make it, she decided to take her vegan and vegetarian recipes and create a food truck in his honor, in hopes of helping other people and families get healthy. (Published Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018)

    Cynthia Nevels owns a Dallas-based food truck called SoulGood that specializes in vegan and vegetarian cuisine.

    "People thought I was crazy to start a vegan/vegetarian food truck in Texas and I didn't think I was crazy [at all]," Nevels said.

    The concept is working for Nevels though and growing in popularity across Dallas.

    "We just got voted best food truck, not even in vegan or vegetarian category, but in Dallas, by the Dallas Observer. I cried literally when I saw that because that's saying something," Nevels said.

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    Her mobile meal machine was born out of necessity years ago when her youngest son, Tyler, was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis.

    "When he was going through the process of waiting for an organ transplant, I felt like the only thing I felt that was in my control was the food that I fed him," Nevels said.

    Sadly, Tyler died, but Nevels wanted to keep his legacy alive. She took all the recipes she put together for him and created the truck.

    "I did research and understanding where trends were going and what mothers were more focused on for healthier food options and knowing where the food came from, I thought I was onto something," Nevels said. "The key to it is creating foods that people can't tell the difference, especially carnivores who are looking for something that they are familiar with but that is healthier."

    Nevels said it's not just about the food though, they are also trying to continue to help others like her son.

    "Five percent of what everyone buys goes to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation in his honor -- in Tyler’s name," Nevels said.

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