Dallas Police: Latest Hate Crime Attack Not Caught on Video - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Dallas Police: Latest Hate Crime Attack Not Caught on Video

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    Police: Latest Hate Crime Attack Not on Video

    Dallas police say the hate-crime beating of a man walking a dog near Cedar Springs Boulevard this weekend was not captured on the department's nearby surveillance cameras. And police, so far, don't have any witnesses. (Published Tuesday, May 3, 2016)

    Dallas Police say the hate-crime beating of a man walking a dog near Cedar-Springs Boulevard this weekend was not captured on the Department's nearby surveillance cameras.

    And Police, so far, don't have any witnesses.
    It's disheartening news for assault victim Craig Knapp. He plans on starting therapy soon to help him deal with the emotional aftermath of his brief, brutal attack.
    "It's all emotional now. It sets in," he said. "It's one day at a time. I'm going to get some help."
    It's the 15th open DPD investigation into attacks and robberies in the Oak Lawn/Cedar Springs neighborhood since September. There've been no arrests.
    Three of them--including Knapp's--have officially been classified as hate crimes. But many other victims believe they were targeted because of their perceived sexual orientation.
    Several community groups like Survivors Offering Support (SOS) and The Resource Center say there've been a dozen other beatings this year on members of the LGBT community, but the victims did not come forward and file a police report.
    Craig Knapp was walking a friend's dog along Dickason Avenue, one block off of Cedar Springs, early Saturday morning after 3am. 
    He says two men approached him and asked just one question before launching into their attack.
    "I hear a gentleman from behind me say, 'what's your dog's name?' And I say 'Sissy.' And he then started chuckling, and that's when he pushed me down, and grabbed my head."
    During the beating the man yelled vulgar and homophobic slurs.
    "It probably took 10 seconds before they ran away, ran off," he said.
    Police had hoped their nearby surveillance cameras might catch a glimpse of the suspects running away-- but police on Tuesday confirm their new surveillance cameras in the area didn't catch them. 
    And once again, police say they just can't close this case with the information they have available at this time.
    "There's a lot more cops. Tremendous amount more. I think the city and the Dallas Police Department are trying hard," Knapp said.
    Three months ago DPD completed installing 10 surveillance cameras near the popular bars, nightclubs, and restaurants. But the cameras aren't focused on the side streets and residential areas.
    Police this year have also re-focused their patrols in that community: tighter perimeters mean more visible cop cars and more officers walking the beat on foot.
    Knapp said he wants to see better lighting on the side streets near the condominiums and apartment complexes, and more motion-action surveillance cameras that could catch fleeing suspects or getaway cars.
    "I think they should increase maybe some foot patrols. I think they're doing what they should be doing. More cameras, obviously," he said.
    Dallas Police are now planning on a new crime watch meeting with residents, businesses, and nearby apartment complex managers, but a date hasn't been set.

    Dallas police say the hate-crime beating of a man walking a dog near Cedar Springs Boulevard this weekend was not captured on the department's nearby surveillance cameras. And police, so far, don't have any witnesses.

    It's disheartening news for assault victim Craig Knapp. He plans on starting therapy soon to help him deal with the emotional aftermath of his brief, brutal attack.

    "It's all emotional now. It sets in," Knapp said. "It's one day at a time. I'm going to get some help."

    It's the 15th open DPD investigation into attacks and robberies in the Oak Lawn/Cedar Springs neighborhood since September. There've been no arrests.

    Three of them--including Knapp's--have officially been classified as hate crimes. But many other victims believe they were targeted because of their perceived sexual orientation.

    Several community groups like Survivors Offering Support (SOS) and The Resource Center say there've been a dozen other beatings this year on members of the LGBT community, but the victims did not come forward and file a police report.

    Knapp was walking a friend's dog along Dickason Avenue, one block off of Cedar Springs, early Saturday morning after 3:00 a.m. 

    He says two men approached him and asked just one question before launching into their attack.

    "I hear a gentleman from behind me say, 'what's your dog's name?' And I say 'Sissy.' And he then started chuckling, and that's when he pushed me down, and grabbed my head."

    During the beating the man yelled vulgar and homophobic slurs.

    "It probably took 10 seconds before they ran away, ran off," he said.

    Police had hoped their nearby surveillance cameras might catch a glimpse of the suspects running away-- but police on Tuesday confirm their new surveillance cameras in the area didn't catch them. 

    And once again, police say they just can't close this case with the information they have available at this time.

    "There's a lot more cops. Tremendous amount more. I think the city and the Dallas Police Department are trying hard," Knapp said.

    Three months ago DPD completed installing 10 surveillance cameras near the popular bars, nightclubs, and restaurants. But the cameras aren't focused on the side streets and residential areas.

    Police this year have also re-focused their patrols in that community: tighter perimeters mean more visible cop cars and more officers walking the beat on foot.

    Knapp said he wants to see better lighting on the side streets near the condominiums and apartment complexes, and more motion-action surveillance cameras that could catch fleeing suspects or getaway cars.

    "I think they should increase maybe some foot patrols. I think they're doing what they should be doing. More cameras, obviously," he said.

    Dallas police are now planning on a new crime watch meeting with residents, businesses, and nearby apartment complex managers, but a date hasn't been set.

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