Early Exposure to Peanuts Could Prevent Allergies: Study - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Early Exposure to Peanuts Could Prevent Allergies: Study

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    Early Exposure to Peanuts Could Prevent Allergies: Study

    A groundbreaking study argues that the key to preventing peanut allergies in children may lie in early and regular exposure to the food, but some parents aren't quite ready for that. Dr Bruce Hensel reports for NBC4 News on Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015. (Published Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015)

    A groundbreaking study released Monday argues that the key to preventing peanut allergies in children may lie in early and regular exposure to the food, but some parents aren't quite ready to expose their children.

    Researchers at King’s College London found introducing peanut snacks to children at high-risk for the allergy made them less likely to develop it by the time they turned 5 than kids who avoided peanut snacks completely.

    "Consumption rather than avoidance seems to protect against developing peanut allergy," said Dr. Gideon Lack, of King’s College.

    But the news doesn't provide relief for parents of kids who already have a potentially fatal peanut allergy. 

    Study: Early Exposure May Thwart Peanut Allergy

    [NATL] Study: Early Exposure May Thwart Peanut Allergy
    A new study funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases suggests that exposing infants who seem likely to develop a peanut allergy to peanuts before their first birthday helps prevent the allergy.
    (Published Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015)

    "We just can’t take a chance. We don’t eat out. We don’t travel on planes. We have to live differently than the normal family," said Debbie Adler, whose 6-year-old son suffers from allergies.

    Adler first discovered her son’s allergies when he experienced a severe reaction after eating frozen yogurt.

    "He started vomiting profusely. I had never seen anything like this. Nonstop. Nonstop. Went on and on until he turned blue and passed out in my arms," Adler said.

    In addition to milk, doctors found Adler’s son also had a peanut allergy. Allergies like his are not only a nuisance, but they can also be deadly. In some cases, just smelling peanuts is enough to cause a child to go into anaphylactic shock.

    Adler’s son is not alone: More than 2 percent of kids in the United States are allergic to peanuts and that number is only climbing, according to the Associated Press. However, the King's College study could help reverse this upward trajectory.

    Researchers enrolled 640 children under age 1 who were at high risk for peanut allergy. Half were given a peanut snack at least three times a week, while the others were told to avoid all peanuts until five.

    Although counterintuitive, the results confirmed avoiding peanuts did not help ward off peanut allergies. In fact, 17 percent of the kids who avoided peanuts developed an allergy by age five. However, only three percent of the kids who ate the peanut snacks developed the same allergy.

    "You need to be introduced to these proteins very early in life," Lack continued.

    There is also a new patch designed to desensitize peanut allergy patients by exposing them to a small dose of peanut protein. The common thread appears to be that a little bit of exposure and consumption seems to teach the body that peanuts are not an enemy.

    Adler hopes this technique will free other families from the debilitating effects of nut allergies.

    "It would change our lives significantly is he could eat all of the things he’s allergic too."

    Dr. Bruce’s Advice: If your kid has a lot of allergies, speak with a doctor and begin exposing them to tiny amounts of the allergens under supervision. If your child gets a rash or other symptoms, stop.