Confused by Health News? You Are Not Alone - NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Confused by Health News? You Are Not Alone

Experts stress considering the source and consulting your doctor

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Confused by Health News? You Are Not Alone

    You can be forgiven if the latest health news can leave you feeling more confused on the subject than you were before. (Published Tuesday, July 10, 2018)

    You can be forgiven if the latest health news can leave you feeling more confused on the subject than you were before. Take studies concerning coffee, for example:

    Coffee is good for you, more science shows: NBC News

    Is Coffee Good for You? Is Coffee Bad for You?: Time

    Why Researchers Think Coffee is Good for You but Still Aren’t Sure: CNBC

    White Official Tells Black Woman He Belonged to Master Race

    [NATL] White Official Tells Black Woman He Belonged to Master Race

    Some Leavenworth County, Kansas, officials are calling for Commissioner Louis Klemp's resignation after he insulted a black woman who had just presented a land-use study to the commission. "I don't want you to think I am picking on you because we are part of the master race. You have a gap in your teeth. We are part of the master race, don't you forget that," Klemp said. 

    (Published Friday, Nov. 16, 2018)

    “I can empathize with the health care consumer regarding what to accept as fact,” said Dr. Madge Barnes, who practices family medicine with Texas Health Family Care in Grand Prairie. “I would be cautious but not skeptical.”

    Savvy news consumers claim they have already taken that approach.

    “It changes every time you turn around. Every year it's a different study that counters the other one, so I don't put a whole lot of stock in that,” said Ray Morgan, of Dallas.

    “They will always discover something wrong with everything, or in reverse,” said Rachel Dallas-Noble, of Dallas.

    There are numerous studies published regularly regarding the purported health benefits or concerns involving a whole host of products. A simple search on popular items like coffee, wine, chocolate and eggs can return a seemingly unending list of contradicting results.

    Dr. Barnes stressed that people would do themselves a huge favor by doing two things: considering the source of the information and consulting their primary care physician if they have any questions.

    “Don’t be quick to change your course of health care management until you speak to your physician, who has most likely received information from medical journals, conferences and other sources prior to the research findings being made available to the public,” Dr. Barnes said. “Reputable sources include those nationally recognized such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and WebMD. But your best resource, again, would be your primary care physician.”

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