Dallas County

Dallas County Reports 3 More Coronavirus-Related Deaths, 172 New Cases of COVID-19

The daily average of new cases in Dallas County this week was down from the previous seven days

NBC 5

Three more people in Dallas County have died after testing positive for COVID-19, health officials reported Saturday, raising the number of coronavirus-related deaths in the county to 210.

Dallas County Health and Human Services also reported 172 more cases of the novel coronavirus, bringing the countywide total to 8,649. An estimated 4,470 people have recovered from COVID-19 in Dallas County, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services.

The three people who died were a Richardson man in his 70s, a Seagoville woman in her 80s and a Mesquite man in his 80s, health officials said.

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"We must all make good decisions and focus not on what is legal, but on what is safe."

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins

The Richardson man and the Mesquite man were both residents of long-term care facilites and had underlying, high-risk health conditions. The Seagoville woman did not have any known underlying conditions, according to Dallas County Health and Human Services.

The 172 cases reported Saturday dropped the average daily number of new coronavirus cases in Dallas County to 200 for the week -- down from an average of 233 daily cases last week, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins said. The county reported 40 deaths this week, an increase of 13 over last week's 27.

"The hospitalizations for COVID-19, ICU admissions, and emergency room visits for COVID-19 symptoms have remained flat over the last week. Overall, this week has been good news and we will hopefully begin to see a decline, but that is entirely up to you," Jenkins said in a written statement. "We must all make good decisions and focus not on what is legal, but on what is safe."

Of COVID-19 cases that required hospitalization among people who reported employment, more than 80% have been in critical infrastructure workers, according to DCHHS.

Jenkins reemphasized that DCHHS recommends residents avoid large crowds, and if they must be in a crowd, that they wear a face covering and maintain 6-foot social distancing.

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