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European Stocks Close Lower After Red Hot U.S. Inflation Data; Delivery Hero Down 30%

Mike Segar | Reuters
  • Major earnings in Europe on Thursday came from Credit Suisse, Unilever and Siemens, among others.
  • The U.S. consumer price index for January rose 7.5% year-on-year, the highest print since 1982.
  • Delivery Hero plunged more than 30% after announcing weak earnings guidance for 2022.

LONDON — European stocks pulled back Thursday after a red hot inflation print out of the U.S. cemented the likelihood of significant interest rate hikes this year.

The pan-European Stoxx 600 closed down by 0.2%, with most sectors and major bourses dipping into the red. Tech stocks, which are typically sensitive to concerns around higher interest rates, were among the worst performers, falling 1.1%.

Global investors were reacting to the latest consumer price index reading from the U.S., which put annual inflation at 7.5% in January, above expectations and the highest print since 1982. U.S. stocks sank following the data release.

Major earnings in Europe on Thursday came from Credit Suisse, Unilever and Siemens, among others.

Siemens posted a 52% surge in orders that led the German technology group to beat industrial profit expectations for the quarter. Shares jumped almost 5%.

Toward the top of the Stoxx 600, British publishing group Informa climbed over 7% as investors reacted positively to its latest trading update.

Credit Suisse posted a full-year net loss of 1.57 billion Swiss francs ($1.7 billion), well below expectations of a 377.95 million Swiss franc loss, according to Refinitiv. The bank said it took "major litigation provisions" of 1.1 billion Swiss francs in 2021. The Swiss lender's shares fell almost 7%.

At the bottom of the Stoxx 600, German food delivery company Delivery Hero plunged more than 30% after announcing weak earnings guidance for 2022.

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- CNBC's Ryan Browne contributed to this report.

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