Residents in Kaufman County Warned of Rising River | NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Continuing coverage of flooding during severe storms in Texas

Residents in Kaufman County Warned of Rising River

No homes flooded as of yet, but many have been warned they could see high water

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    NEWSLETTERS

    With Lake Ray Hubbard and Lake Lavon full and discharging water, residents in western Kaufman County have been warned about possible flooding. Residents say the East Fork of the Trinity River is usually just 8-feet wide when it passes under Farm-to-Market Road 3039. On Sunday morning, it stretched close to a half-mile wide. (Published Sunday, May 31, 2015)

    The rain has stopped, but now the concern grows downstream.

    With Lake Ray Hubbard and Lake Lavon full and discharging water, residents in western Kaufman County have been warned about possible flooding.
    Residents say the East Fork of the Trinity River is usually just 8-feet wide when it passes under Farm-to-Market Road 3039. On Sunday morning, it stretched close to a half-mile wide.
    "It looks bad but it can still hold a lot of water yet," said resident Frank Farr.
    Farr lives just a mile down river and is keeping a close eye on what usually lies several hundred yards from his house.
    "I just check it on a daily basis, being retired and stuff, but as far as I know I should be OK," Farr said.
    So far, no one in Combine has seen any flooding from the rising river, but the Kaufman County Office of Emergency Management has warned residents the river isn't done and that homes in low-lying areas, close to the East Fork, could be in danger.
    Emergency Manager Steve Howie doesn't know exactly how many homes could be threatened but says if there's anything major they'll all be alerted. Saying there's a distinct chance FM 3039 could be flooded over as early as Sunday night.
    "If it's like that tomorrow, the school buses and stuff probably won't be able to get down it," Farr said.
    Farr has seen that happen a number of times in his 75 years here, but said this isn't the worst.
    "As long as I can remember, I'd say where I'm at right here can get up to 10 foot higher probably," Farr said.
    That's something Farr and emergency managers hope doesn't happen as all they can do is watch and wait.
    "We're fine," Farr said.
    Officials are also monitoring the Bois d'Arc Island levee, which is on private property. However only two homes are threatened by a possible breach and the property owner is aware of what could happen.