Heat Advisory Issued as Heat Index Rises Above 100 Degrees | NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Heat Advisory Issued as Heat Index Rises Above 100 Degrees



    While those who work outside are warned to be cautious, there some some jobs, even in this heat, where coats are comfortable. (Published Wednesday, June 15, 2016)

    A heat advisory has been extended for all of North Texas, including the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, as temperatures reach dangerous levels this week.

    The advisory is in effect from noon Wednesday until 8 p.m. Saturday and includes the following counties: Anderson, Collin, Cooke, Dallas, Delta, Denton, Ellis, Erath, Fannin, Freestone, Grayson, Hamilton, Henderson, Hill, Hood, Hopkins, Hunt, Jack, Johnson, Kaufman, Lamar, Montague, Navarro, Palo Pinto, Parker, Rains, Red River, Rockwall, Somervell, Tarrant, Van Zandt and Wise.

    High temperatures are expected to reach the middle and upper 90s, with the heat index approaching values around 105 degrees due to a high amount of humidity in the air.

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    While those who work outside are warned to be cautious, there some some jobs, even in this heat, where coats are comfortable. 

    "About 40 degrees year-round in here," said NYTEX Zamboni driver Max Tosh. "So no matter how hot it is outside, it's nice and cool in here." 

    At the Reddy Ice vault in Fort Worth, the temperature is kept at 19 degrees.

    "I used to have to keep a coat on all the time," delivery driver Michael Harris explained. "Over time, you get used to it."

    Heat exhaustion or heat stroke can quickly develop when the heat index is that high, the National Weather Service warns. Avoid serious illness by drinking plenty of water, wearing light and loose-fitting clothing when possible and avoiding strenuous outdoor activities during the afternoon.

    Heat Advisory Precautions


    With such oppressive heat in the forecast, North Texans are reminded to check on their friends and loved ones with health problems as they may be among the most susceptible to heat exhaustion and heat stroke.


    As always, never leave young children or pets unattended in an enclosed vehicle, even for a short amount of time, as temperatures can quickly rise to threatening levels.


    Pets should not be left unattended outdoors for more than a few minutes.


    Water is the cornerstone to staying safe this week, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Officials said it's important to start drinking before becoming thirsty and if you know you're going to be out in the heat, begin drinking water the night before.


    Officials recommend staying indoors, but anyone who must be outside should drink a cup of water about every 20 minutes and wear lightweight, loose-fitting clothing.


    Symptoms of Heat Stroke: CDC


    • Hot, dry skin or profuse sweating
    • Hallucinations
    • Chills
    • Throbbing headache
    • High body temperature
    • Confusion/dizziness
    • Slurred speech


    Take the following steps to treat a worker with heat stroke:


    • Call 911 and notify their supervisor.
    • Move the sick worker to a cool shaded area.
    • Cool the worker using methods such as:
      • Soaking their clothes with water.
      • Spraying, sponging, or showering them with water.
      • Fanning their body.


    Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion: CDC


    • Heavy sweating
    • Extreme weakness or fatigue
    • Dizziness, confusion
    • Nausea
    • Clammy, moist skin
    • Pale or flushed complexion
    • Muscle cramps
    • Slightly elevated body temperature
    • Fast and shallow breathing


    Treat a worker suffering from heat exhaustion with the following:


    • Have them rest in a cool, shaded or air-conditioned area.
    • Have them drink plenty of water or other cool, nonalcoholic beverages.
    • Have them take a cool shower, bath, or sponge bath. 


    Online: CDC's Tips for Preventing Heat-Related Illness

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